Butterflies make partial comeback in Mexico

February 14, 2011

(AP) -- Experts are reporting a partial recovery in the annual winter migration of Monarch butterflies to Mexico following a devastating 75 percent drop last year.

The conservation group World Wildlife Federation Mexico says the orange-and-black from the U.S. and Canada are covering an area of forests that is more than double that of last year, when their numbers dropped to historic lows.

But WWF director Omar Vidal said Monday the numbers are still well below average.

The butterflies have occupied 9.9 acres (4 hectares) of colonies thus far in the 2010-2011 winter season - more than double the 4.7 acres (1.9 hectares) they covered last year.

They covered almost 20 acres (8 hectares) in the 2008-2009 season.

Explore further: Monarchs fly south for the winter


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not rated yet Feb 14, 2011
Perhaps the drop-off occurred because the "invasion biology" fanatics have destroyed so many of the Monarch's favorite overwintering trees, the Eucalyptus, under the bogus theory that these trees are "degrading the environment". The only species that is truly degrading the environment is humanity, pure and simple. Leave the trees alone and let the butterflies flourish. Natural processes work so much better without human interference.
1 / 5 (1) Feb 16, 2011
The demise of the monarch butterfly was blamed on global climate change....my how fast we have turned that around, humanity is so powerful.

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