Toshiba returns to black on smartphone chip demand

Jan 31, 2011

(AP) -- Toshiba Corp. said Monday it returned to the black in the October-December quarter thanks to robust global demand for the flash memory chips used in digital cameras and smartphones.

Toshiba's net profit of 12.4 billion yen ($151 million) reversed a net loss of 10.6 billion yen in the same period in 2009.

The Japanese conglomerate - whose business encompasses everything from memory chips to household electronics to nuclear power plants - said booming global demand for flash memory chips helped the company swing into the black for the quarter.

Toshiba is one of the world's largest producers of NAND-flash memory, the chips used for storage on smartphones, portable music players, mobile phones and digital cameras.

Operating income from its electronic devices business which includes flash memory chips, totaled 17.3 billion yen in the October-December quarter compared with an operating loss of 6.6 billion yen in the same period in 2009.

Toshiba's quarterly revenue rose 1.6 percent year-on-year to 1.6 trillion yen. Over half of Toshiba's revenue comes from overseas. Toshiba's sales in North America expanded 7.2 percent with those in Asia slightly down.

For the nine months to December, Toshiba's operating income surged to a record 142 billion yen from 16.6 billion yen in the same period in 2009.

For the fiscal year through March 2011, Toshiba expects to post a net profit of 100 billion yen, against a net loss of 19.7 billion yen a year earlier, with revenue likely to increase by 4.9 percent to 6.6 trillion yen.

Explore further: Monoprice takes on Amazon in trade of cheap electronics

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Japan's Toshiba sees losses narrow

May 07, 2010

Japanese high-tech giant Toshiba Corp. announced Friday a sharply narrowed annual net loss based on strong demand for flash memory chips used in laptops, smartphones and other gadgets.

Toshiba to spend big on chips, nuclear power

May 11, 2010

(AP) -- Toshiba Corp. unveiled an ambitious three-year agenda Tuesday, aiming to quadruple profits and spend $14 billion to amplify its strengths in semiconductors and nuclear power.

Toshiba profits surge but yen overshadows outlook

Nov 09, 2010

Japanese electronics giant Toshiba said Tuesday its net profit surged in the three months ended September from a year earlier but left its profit outlook unchanged on uncertainties caused by a strong yen.

NEC sees losses triple

Jan 27, 2011

Japan's NEC said Thursday its net loss in the October-December quarter almost tripled from a year earlier, blaming a delay in the recovery of IT-related capital investment in the country.

Japan's Toshiba still in red

Jul 29, 2009

Japanese high-tech giant Toshiba said Wednesday it had lost more than 600 million dollars in the fiscal first quarter as the economic downturn hit sales of televisions and other electronics.

Recommended for you

Chinese tech giant Alibaba set to make a splash with US IPO

11 hours ago

The largest tech IPO of the year will come from a company that many Americans have never heard of. Alibaba Group - a Chinese e-commerce behemoth - has decided to go public in the U.S. after months of speculation that it would ...

Ex-Apple chief plans mobile phone for India

Apr 19, 2014

Former Apple chief executive John Sculley, whose marketing skills helped bring the personal computer to desktops worldwide, says he plans to launch a mobile phone in India to exploit its still largely untapped ...

Airbnb rental site raises $450 mn

Apr 19, 2014

Online lodging listings website Airbnb inked a $450 million funding deal with investors led by TPG, a source close to the matter said Friday.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Growing app industry has developers racing to keep up

Smartphone application developers say they are challenged by the glut of apps as well as the need to update their software to keep up with evolving phone technology, making creative pricing strategies essential to finding ...

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.