US solar firm to build $300 mln Vietnam plant

Jan 26, 2011
An employee makes a final check on a solar panel at the Renewable Energy Corporation (REC) factory in Singapore in November. A US solar panel maker Wednesday said it will build a $300 million factory in Vietnam, boosting the country's efforts to reinvent itself as a hub for high-tech manufacturing.

A US solar panel maker Wednesday said it will build a $300 million factory in Vietnam, boosting the country's efforts to reinvent itself as a hub for high-tech manufacturing.

Arizona-based First Solar said Vietnamese authorities had approved the investment in Ho Chi Minh City's Cu Chi district, in the south of the country.

The facility will employ around 600 people and production is expected to begin in the second half of next year, a company spokeswoman told AFP.

is still a rural-based society that has relied on natural resources and unskilled labour to achieve growth. But the country's communist leaders now speak of moving to a more technologically advanced system of production.

"You're seeing more and more high-tech firms come into Vietnam," outgoing United States ambassador Michael Michalak said at his farewell press conference this month. He cited First Solar's plans as an example.

In October the US-based chip maker opened a billion-dollar plant in Ho Chi Minh City.

Explore further: Environmentally compatible organic solar cells

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Intel opens biggest ever chip plant in Vietnam

Oct 29, 2010

US-based chip maker Intel on Friday opened a billion-dollar plant in Vietnam, the company's biggest in the world, expected to create thousands of skilled jobs as the nation moves from low to hi-tech.

IBM sets up 'innovation center' in Vietnam

May 22, 2009

US computer giant IBM on Friday announced it had set up its first "innovation center" in Vietnam and forged partnerships with leading Vietnamese universities.

No guy-in-a-bar iPhone story in Vietnam

May 13, 2010

(AP) -- This time it's not a crazy story about a guy who left a phone in a Silicon Valley bar. The latest clamor over a possible next-generation iPhone prototype has erupted in an unlikely place - Vietnam.

Recommended for you

Obama launches measures to support solar energy in US

11 hours ago

The White House Thursday announced a series of measures aimed at increasing solar energy production in the United States, particularly by encouraging the installation of solar panels in public spaces.

Tailored approach key to cookstove uptake

12 hours ago

Worldwide, programs aiming to give safe, efficient cooking stoves to people in developing countries haven't had complete success—and local research has looked into why.

Wireless power transfer achieved at five-meter distance

12 hours ago

The way electronic devices receive their power has changed tremendously over the past few decades, from wired to non-wired. Users today enjoy all kinds of wireless electronic gadgets including cell phones, ...

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

knikiy
not rated yet Jan 26, 2011
That's right AZ, send those jobs overseas.
Lord_jag
not rated yet Jan 29, 2011
Come now. We know American's don't want jobs.

At least not when the jobs pay $0.35/hour.

More news stories

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...

Better thermal-imaging lens from waste sulfur

Sulfur left over from refining fossil fuels can be transformed into cheap, lightweight, plastic lenses for infrared devices, including night-vision goggles, a University of Arizona-led international team ...

Deadly human pathogen Cryptococcus fully sequenced

Within each strand of DNA lies the blueprint for building an organism, along with the keys to its evolution and survival. These genetic instructions can give valuable insight into why pathogens like Cryptococcus ne ...