The Oscar curse? Study says that Oscar win for best actress increases the risk of divorce

Jan 28, 2011

Will Academy Award nominees Nicole Kidman and Annette Bening be at higher risk for a divorce if they win the Oscar for best actress next month? A long line of best actress winners including Joan Crawford, Bette Davis, Halle Berry and Kate Winslet experienced the end of their marriages not long after taking home their awards.

A study by researchers at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management and Carnegie Mellon University finds that Oscar winners in the Best Actress category are at a higher risk of than nominees who do not win. By contrast, Best Actor winners do not experience an increase in the risk of after an Oscar.

"Research has shown that, in the general population, have historically given roles with greater power and status to men and roles with lesser status and power to women. Studies have demonstrated that breaching this social norm within a marriage—for example, when a wife earns more than her husband—can strain the relationship," says Tiziana Casciaro, an assistant professor of organizational behavior at the Rotman School, who co-authored the study with Colleen Stuart, a post-doctoral fellow at Carnegie Mellon University, and Sue Moon, a PhD student at the Rotman School.

"It appears that even the marriages of Hollywood actresses at the top of their careers are not immune to the consequences of violating social norms that affect the wider population. Our results suggest that the sudden success reduces the longevity of their marriages," says Stuart.

The study looked at the 751 nominees in the best actor and actress categories of the Academy Awards between1936 to 2010. The results show that Best Actress winners have a 63% chance of their marriages ending sooner than the marriages of non-winners. The median marriage duration for Best Actress winners was 4.30 years, substantially lower than the 9.51 year duration for non-winners. By contrast, the difference between Best Actor non-winners (median = 12.66 years) and Best Actor winners (median = 11.97 years) was not statistically significant.

Explore further: Computer game could help visually-impaired children live independently

More information: The complete study is available at: papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cf… ?abstract_id=1749612

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geokstr
1 / 5 (1) Jan 28, 2011
Typical.

Three feminist "professors" blame the jealousy of men for the divorces of successful women. Maybe it's because the success swells their head to the point of being impossible to live with. Perhaps it's because the female spouses of the male winners are quite happy that their gravy trains will be even better equipped now to give them the lifestyle they believe they are entitled to.

But what is the purpose of just concentrating on the winners? The losing nominees will also see vastly enhanced incomes and career opportunities as well, just like most of the finalists and semi-finalists of "American Idol" get recording contracts, not just the winners.

I wonder, do these "scientists" ever study the relationship of how quickly women drop their drawers and spread for successful men, often no matter how ugly and fat those men might be? And how those men's marriages fare afterwards?

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