'Nuclear' candy turns out to be toxic

Jan 14, 2011

US authorities issued a recall Friday for a brand of Pakistan-made candy called Toxic Waste Nuclear Sludge Chew Bars because it turns out the sweets actually are toxic.

Tests showed that the cherry flavoring in the chew bars contained extremely high levels of lead -- 0.24 parts per million when the US limit is 0.1.

"That potentially could cause health problems, particularly for infants, small children, and ," the said.

The recall affects all flavors of the and all the bars the company ever made from its inception in 2007 until January 2011.

The candy was imported from Pakistan by an Indiana-based company called Circle City Marketing and Distributing, which said it has not received any reports of sickness from the product.

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User comments : 11

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Royale
5 / 5 (1) Jan 14, 2011
Pakistan's apparent weak try at terrorism. (That was a joke by the way, so no flaming please).

I love that quote; "The recall affects all flavors of the candy and all the bars the company ever made from its inception in 2007 until January 2011."

Hahaha. We're recalling everything this company has ever made.
dirk_bruere
5 / 5 (5) Jan 14, 2011
Seems the name is quite accurate.
sstritt
3.4 / 5 (5) Jan 14, 2011
Truth in advertising!
gwrede
3 / 5 (4) Jan 14, 2011
Circle City Marketing and Distributing, which said it has not received any reports of sickness from the product.
Duh!

If the levels are only 2 1/2 times the legal minimum, how could there be any sickness.

But that's hardly the point, now is it?
mvg
5 / 5 (1) Jan 14, 2011
Who would have guesssed it was really toxic??
Bob_Kob
3 / 5 (4) Jan 14, 2011
Why is is always lead...
fixer
5 / 5 (2) Jan 14, 2011
2 1/2 times the MAXIMUM.

But yeah, more manufacturers should advertise accurately.
Skeptic_Heretic
3.7 / 5 (3) Jan 15, 2011
2 1/2 times the MAXIMUM.
Doesn't it disturb you people that there is an acceptable maximum amount of lead allowed in any candy?

What exactly is an acceptable amount of lead in candy? According to the article, it's 0.1 ppm

trekgeek1
2 / 5 (1) Jan 16, 2011
2 1/2 times the MAXIMUM.
Doesn't it disturb you people that there is an acceptable maximum amount of lead allowed in any candy?

What exactly is an acceptable amount of lead in candy? According to the article, it's 0.1 ppm



You'll never remove every atom of certain elements from food, so it's reasonable to allow a tolerable limit.
Veneficus
1 / 5 (3) Jan 17, 2011
A factor 2.5 can hardly be called dangerous. Safety margins will be higher than that anyway.
fixer
5 / 5 (1) Jan 18, 2011
They probably are, but would you willinly eat lead?