NASA infrared data sees birth of 10th tropical depression in Southern Indian Ocean near Australian coast

Jan 25, 2011
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm 10S on Jan. 25 at 05:53 UTC (12:53 a.m. EST). The image shows most of the coldest cloud tops (-63 Fahrenheit) and strongest thunderstorms over appear (in purple) over the Southern Indian Ocean, and some along the extreme northern coast of Western Australia. The red coloration further south is the heat of the land. Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of the very cold clouds that house powerful thunderstorms within the Southern Indian Ocean's newest tropical depression, number 10S. The depression quickly strengthened into a tropical storm and continues to affect the northern coast of Western Australia.

When Aqua passed over the Tropical Storm 10S on January 25 at 05:53 UTC (12:53 a.m. EST), the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured an of the storm's clouds. The image showed that most of the coldest (-63 Fahrenheit/-52 Celsius) and strongest thunderstorms over appeared over the Southern Indian Ocean, and some along the extreme northern coast of Western Australia. The infrared image also showed the contrasting heat of the land.

A Cyclone Warning is current for coastal and island communities from Cape Leveque to Coral Bay. At 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST) on January 25, Tropical Storm 10S had of 35 knots (40 mph / 64 km/hr). Tropical Storm 10S was located about 525 miles ENE of Learmonth, Australia near 17.4 South latitude and 121.8 East longitude. It was moving southwest near 15 knots (17 mph/27 km/hr). Waves along coastal areas could reach 10 feet, so beach erosion is likely, and low level flooding is possible. At 17:30 UTC (2:30 p.m. EST), moderate to heavy rains were moving toward Port Hedland, in advance of the center of 10S.

TD 10S is moving southwest and is forecast to move parallel to the western coastline of Australia. The storm is expected to strengthen to hurricane force but not threaten land areas.

Explore further: NASA ocean data shows 'climate dance' of plankton

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NASA's Aqua Satellite sees a tight Tropical Storm 21S

Mar 23, 2010

The Southern Indian Ocean is still warm enough to enable tropical cyclones to form, and Tropical Cyclone 21S did just that today. NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared and visible images of 21S and the infrared ...

Recommended for you

NASA ocean data shows 'climate dance' of plankton

1 hour ago

The greens and blues of the ocean color from NASA satellite data have provided new insights into how climate and ecosystem processes affect the growth cycles of phytoplankton—microscopic aquatic plants ...

Glaciers in the grand canyon of Mars?

2 hours ago

For decades, planetary geologists have speculated that glaciers might once have crept through Valles Marineris, the 2000-mile-long chasm that constitutes the Grand Canyon of Mars. Using satellite images, ...

NASA support key to glacier mapping efforts

2 hours ago

Thanks in part to support from NASA and the National Science Foundation, scientists have produced the first-ever detailed maps of bedrock beneath glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica. This new data will help ...

Advancing the state-of-the-art in seismic science

3 hours ago

Data received from seismic monitoring stations coupled with information rapidly shared via smartphones and the Internet by those who experienced the south Napa temblor is serving to advance scientists' understanding ...

The threat of global sea level rise

3 hours ago

Changes taking place in the oceans around Antarctica could result in an abrupt rise in global sea level, according to a Victoria University of Wellington led study.

User comments : 0