NASA infrared data sees birth of 10th tropical depression in Southern Indian Ocean near Australian coast

Jan 25, 2011
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm 10S on Jan. 25 at 05:53 UTC (12:53 a.m. EST). The image shows most of the coldest cloud tops (-63 Fahrenheit) and strongest thunderstorms over appear (in purple) over the Southern Indian Ocean, and some along the extreme northern coast of Western Australia. The red coloration further south is the heat of the land. Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of the very cold clouds that house powerful thunderstorms within the Southern Indian Ocean's newest tropical depression, number 10S. The depression quickly strengthened into a tropical storm and continues to affect the northern coast of Western Australia.

When Aqua passed over the Tropical Storm 10S on January 25 at 05:53 UTC (12:53 a.m. EST), the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured an of the storm's clouds. The image showed that most of the coldest (-63 Fahrenheit/-52 Celsius) and strongest thunderstorms over appeared over the Southern Indian Ocean, and some along the extreme northern coast of Western Australia. The infrared image also showed the contrasting heat of the land.

A Cyclone Warning is current for coastal and island communities from Cape Leveque to Coral Bay. At 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST) on January 25, Tropical Storm 10S had of 35 knots (40 mph / 64 km/hr). Tropical Storm 10S was located about 525 miles ENE of Learmonth, Australia near 17.4 South latitude and 121.8 East longitude. It was moving southwest near 15 knots (17 mph/27 km/hr). Waves along coastal areas could reach 10 feet, so beach erosion is likely, and low level flooding is possible. At 17:30 UTC (2:30 p.m. EST), moderate to heavy rains were moving toward Port Hedland, in advance of the center of 10S.

TD 10S is moving southwest and is forecast to move parallel to the western coastline of Australia. The storm is expected to strengthen to hurricane force but not threaten land areas.

Explore further: Sea-level surge at Antarctica linked to icesheet loss

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NASA's Aqua Satellite sees a tight Tropical Storm 21S

Mar 23, 2010

The Southern Indian Ocean is still warm enough to enable tropical cyclones to form, and Tropical Cyclone 21S did just that today. NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared and visible images of 21S and the infrared ...

Recommended for you

Aging Africa

Aug 29, 2014

In the September issue of GSA Today, Paul Bierman of the University of Vermont–Burlington and colleagues present a cosmogenic view of erosion, relief generation, and the age of faulting in southernmost Africa ...

NASA animation shows Hurricane Marie winding down

Aug 29, 2014

NOAA's GOES-West satellite keeps a continuous eye on the Eastern Pacific and has been covering Hurricane Marie since birth. NASA's GOES Project uses NOAA data and creates animations and did so to show the end of Hurricane ...

EU project sails off to study Arctic sea ice

Aug 29, 2014

A one-of-a-kind scientific expedition is currently heading to the Arctic, aboard the South Korean icebreaker Araon. This joint initiative of the US and Korea will measure atmospheric, sea ice and ocean properties with technology ...

User comments : 0