Japanese firm invents mirror to spot the flu

Jan 11, 2011
The world's first mirror thermometer, NEC Avio Infrared Technologies' "Thermo Mirror", is unveiled in Tokyo. The device measures the user's skin temperature without the need for physical contact, using a built-in infrared sensor.

As Japan's flu season gets into full swing, a local technology firm Tuesday unveiled a mirror-like thermometer that can detect and identify a person who is feverish.

"Thermo ," which looks like a table mirror, measures the skin temperature of the person looking into it, without the need for physical contact, said the firm, NEC Avio Infrared Technologies.

The person's temperature is displayed on the surface, and the device has an alarm that will beep when detecting a subject who is feverish.

With two versions priced at 98,000 yen and 120,000 yen ($1,180-$1,440) each, the product costs less than 10 percent of thermography cameras used at airports to screen for people who might have communicable diseases, the company said.

"We foresee uses at corporate receptions, schools, hospitals and public facilities," NEC Avio said in a statement.

The company said it aimed to sell 5,000 units in one year.

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TJ_alberta
5 / 5 (2) Jan 11, 2011
Take a look at the Bill Gates Unplugged video on youtube. It seems to me that is kind of like the future products he was talking about.

Now, NEC Avio need to ad video recognition that will check for dilated pupils, skin color compared to normal for the same face, etc. & it could also have built in voice synthesizer with advice / advertising: "Honey, you look like shit, take two [Advil, Tylonol, etc.] and go home ..."