Japan delays space cargo launch

Jan 19, 2011

Bad weather delayed Wednesday the launch of a Japan space agency mission to deliver cargo to the International Space Station.

The HTV2 transporter will deliver more than five tons of supplies to the space station, including food, water and experimental tools for astronauts, according to the Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA).

The original launch date for the H-IIB rocket, which will carry the transporter also called "Kounotori (stork) 2" was Thursday, and a new schedule has yet to be decided.

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