Japan to launch space cargo mission Saturday

Jan 21, 2011

Japan's space agency said it would launch a rocket on Saturday to deliver more than five tons of supplies to the International Space Station, after an earlier postponement.

The H-IIB rocket will ferry cargo including food, water and experimental tools for astronauts, according to the Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA).

The rocket, which will carry the "Kounotori (stork) 2" cargo transporter, was due to launch Thursday but was delayed by bad weather.

The new scheduled launch time is 2:37 pm (0537 GMT) on Saturday, JAXA said.

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