World IPv6 Day test runs 24 hours starting June 8

Jan 20, 2011 by John Messina weblog
IPv6 is a new version of the Internet Protocol that is designed to succeed the existing Internet Protocol version 4.

(PhysOrg.com) -- Today's Internet protocol, IPv4, is expected to run out of space this year. On World IPv6 Day the first steps will be taken to test a long-term solution that will address the 30 year old 32 bit addresses.

On June 8, 2011 major web companies such as , and Yahoo!, will allow to run on their main websites for 24 hours. These websites along with have more than one billion combined visits each day. They are joining major content delivery networks Akamai and Limelight Networks along with the Internet Society, for the first global-scale 24 hour trial run of the new , IPv6.

Internet users will not have to do anything to prepare for this 24 hour global event. According to the Internet Society, the vast majority of users, about 99.5%, will be unaffected. There will be some cases where users may experience connectivity problems due to the fact that their home network device is not configured correctly.

The major goal of World IPv6 Day is to identify the potential problems under controlled testing and address them in a timely manner. Organizations involved in this global event will be working alongside operating system manufacturers, networking vendors and ISPs to minimize the number of users affected.

World IPv6 Day marks a critical day in Internet history that will pave the way for future growth and enabling more computers, networks and handheld devices to come online.

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More information: World IPv6 Day, IPv6

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trejrco
5 / 5 (8) Jan 20, 2011
First, let me say thanks for helping to get the word out about "IPv6 Day" ;).

However, the video is inaccurate in many cases - not the least of which impacts the title of your article. "4 billion times more space" is woefully under-valuing the amount of address space IPv6 brings to the table ... the simple math, 2^32 addresses for IPv4 and 2^128 for IPv6. So it isn't *4.3B, it is *4.3B*4.3B*4.3B ...

Additionally, just real quick: 6to4 has nothing to do with migrating from 4 to 6, ISATAP *can* be used on the global internet (although not it's primary deployment scenario), ISATAP doesn't reveal the link-local addresses to the IPv6 side, ISATAP packets *can* be routed over IPv4, 6to4 *is* a tunnel between the sites, etc. etc.

/TJ
Foolish1
not rated yet Jan 20, 2011
The video is out of place in the context of the topic of IPv6 day and makes an error regarding 6to4.

All 6to4 does is tunnel IPv6 thru v4. It does not allow access to IPv4 network/content from an IPv6 only network. This scenario requires NAT.

The reason use of transition technologies are orthogonal to IPv6 day is that per the IPv6 specification interim transition technologies are only used when there is no IPv4 connectivity to the destination host. During IPv6 day google, facebook..etc shall be accessible via IPv4 AND IPv6. 6to4 and teredo tunnels will be ignored because of the policy preferencing IPv4 over transition tunneled IPv6.
CSharpner
5 / 5 (3) Jan 20, 2011
"4 billion times more space" is woefully under-valuing the amount of address space IPv6 brings to the table ... the simple math, 2^32 addresses for IPv4 and 2^128 for IPv6. So it isn't *4.3B, it is *4.3B*4.3B*4.3B ...

Thanks for posting that. You beat me to it. It's a SIGNIFICANT difference! I fived you.
Modernmystic
3.3 / 5 (4) Jan 20, 2011
Skynet commeth...

Seriously though I just got to thinking back when I got on the internet in...oh, I guess it was '93 there were a few hundred thousand webpages...and I was hooked even back then.
gwrede
3.7 / 5 (3) Jan 20, 2011
Oh, the old times. I was using the Internet since the late 80s. Then, at a national university data center coference, fall 1993, we were informed that within a year we are going to drop Gopher and go for something called WorldWideWeb.

The problem with Gopher was that, although it was easy to use and publish, that day's university staff (who today would classify as computer illiterate) were reluctant with publishing with Gopher. And it was rumored that Gopher whould start collecting fees.

And now you could even have pictures in the text. And to top it all, the pictures didn't even have to be on the same server, which was a "far-out" concept.

We were familiar with hypertext, it had been hyped for years by Doug Engelbart, so this was another dream come true.

At the end of 93 there were some six hundred web sites, and 2% of net traffic was http, the majority being ftp, netnews, email and telnet. At the time, there was no spam, and no firewalls were needed. Oh, the old times.
Skeptic_Heretic
not rated yet Jan 20, 2011
First, let me say thanks for helping to get the word out about "IPv6 Day" ;).

However, the video is inaccurate in many cases - not the least of which impacts the title of your article. "4 billion times more space" is woefully under-valuing the amount of address space IPv6 brings to the table ... the simple math, 2^32 addresses for IPv4 and 2^128 for IPv6. So it isn't *4.3B, it is *4.3B*4.3B*4.3B ...

Additionally, just real quick: 6to4 has nothing to do with migrating from 4 to 6, ISATAP *can* be used on the global internet (although not it's primary deployment scenario), ISATAP doesn't reveal the link-local addresses to the IPv6 side, ISATAP packets *can* be routed over IPv4, 6to4 *is* a tunnel between the sites, etc. etc.

/TJ

Yep. 2^128. 340 trillion trillion trillion addresses in total, or 3.4*10^38
At the time, there was no spam, and no firewalls were needed. Oh, the old times.
BBS spam was utter shit.
droid001
not rated yet Jan 21, 2011
I remember the first time I saw an animated GIF on the Web - I thought that this is virus and quickly cut the power
stealthc
1 / 5 (1) Jan 23, 2011
I've watched w3c, this is nothing more than a ploy to make the protocols more internet license friendly -- the widespread use of nat has made it next to impossible to meter out internet access using licenses, ipv6 aims to increase address space to eliminate such widespread use of NAT's.