New Intel chip a coup for Hollywood

Jan 05, 2011 by Glenn Chapman
Intel CEO Paul Otellini pauses as he speaks to reporters in 2009. US chip giant Intel introduced Wednesday a speedy new generation of chips that thwart film piracy and enable quick handling of data-rich video and games.

US chip giant Intel introduced Wednesday a speedy new generation of chips that thwart film piracy and enable quick handling of data-rich video and games.

The second-generation Core processors, referred to as "Sandy Bridge," have been built into computers big and small, many of which will be displayed at the kicking off here Thursday.

"This is the best product we've ever built," said Intel chief executive Paul Otellini. "We've shifted to processor-based graphics."

Building graphics computing into chips enables slick handling of games, images and video at a time when lifestyles are increasingly shifting to online entertainment loaded with data sent online.

"We are hooked on the Internet," Intel vice president Shmuel "Mooly" Eden said while showing off Sandy Bridge-driven computers at a press event. "PCs (personal computers) are no longer a luxury, they are a necessity."

Sandy Bridge was welcomed by Hollywood and Bollywood film studios that have been reluctant to make prime releases available online to computers, where they could potentially be copied or shared without permission.

Intel worked with major US and India film studios, including Warner Brothers, DreamWorks, Yash Raj Films and 20th Century Fox to craft copyright-guarding technology into the chips.

Warner Brothers has avoided putting high-definition or 3D releases online because of the potential for piracy.

"You've taken the excuse away from us," Warner Brothers Home Entertainment Group president Kevin Tsujihara told Eden during an on-stage appearance.

"Sandy Bridge lets us put our content out there on a global basis."

Studios working with Intel will make hot releases available to Sandy Bridge-driven PCs through online services such as Cinema Now.

Films can be routed from PCs to TVs.

"Our partnership with Intel creates a game changing opportunity to provide consumers around the globe our highest value content in a secure environment," said 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment worldwide president Mike Dunn.

Eden predicted that Sandy Bridge, with 1.16 billion transistors on each , would be "a cornerstone of the computer revolution."

A million PCs are sold daily, with consumers driving the market instead of businesses, according to Intel.

"The consumer is king, and queen," Eden said. "It is all about consuming and creating digital content."

People are shifting to communicating with photos and video instead of simple text email.

Sandy Bridge enables fast conversion of video for increasingly common tasks such as shifting digital snippets from personal computers to iPads or iPods, or transferring content from handheld cameras onto desktop machines.

The chips have enough power to smoothly handle real-time gesture-based controls and even enhance computer games with animated versions of players that mimic movements and facial expressions, according to Eden.

"Finally, we have enough computer power to deliver real-time interaction between us and the computer," Eden said.

"Soon, you will be able to take my face and I will be able to be the hero, or some would argue villain, in a game."

He predicted that in the coming two to four years, Sandy Bridge will enable advances that have people looking at computer keyboards as though they were from "the Middle Ages."

"Pretty soon, you will not know if you are in the real world or the virtual world," he said.

Sandy Bridge chips will be featured in 500 devices from mobile handsets to notebook and desktop computers, according to Intel.

Sandy Bridge will represent more than a third of Intel's revenue this year, and generate 125 billion dollars in revenue for the PC industry, Otellini predicted.

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User comments : 31

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Eikka
4.3 / 5 (12) Jan 05, 2011
Intel - Making the internet into a corporate controller pay-tv one bit at a time.
Quantum_Conundrum
4.6 / 5 (10) Jan 05, 2011
Eden predicted that Sandy Bridge, with 1.16 billion transistors on each chip, would be "a cornerstone of the computer revolution


I don't see how one chip with only 1.16 billion transistors could possibly out perform a system with a seperate video card, which top of the line cards have 384 to 1600 processor cores and 1 to 1.5 gigabytes of RAM.

How can this one chip possibly do the same job with less than 1/3rd as many transistors, while still doing everything than the CPU normally does just as well?
Quantum_Conundrum
3.2 / 5 (11) Jan 05, 2011
Intel - Making the internet into a corporate controller pay-tv one bit at a time.


It seems like we are never going to have a world like Star Trek, where people do what's right because it's right, and humans share knowledge and technology for their own good, instead of abuses like this.

It seems like in the future we are going to be stuck with "the corporation," like in the Aliens movie, which owns everything and tells everyone what to do, and pretty much just values profits over human life.
Husky
not rated yet Jan 05, 2011
well it could be tuned for decoding Divx, that doesn't mean it will perform great in games/vertex shading etc
JimB135
5 / 5 (2) Jan 05, 2011
So all of the good content will be tied strictly to Sandy Bridge devices. All of the other devices that don't use Sandy Bridge chips will be left out. Yeah this will really make people happy and want to run right out and buy an intel only Sandy Bridge computer.
Not so much.
Quantum_Conundrum
4.4 / 5 (7) Jan 05, 2011
I wonder if Intel realizes their profits are tied to end users, and not to those who create content per se.

When people get pissed off with this sort of manipulation they will switch to a competitor's products, like AMD, particularly since AMD tends to make "slightly less powerful, but 1/10th the cost" chips...
nada
5 / 5 (6) Jan 05, 2011
The first chip to be able to perform illegal search and seizures in Real-Time!

Thank you Sir, may I have another.

Stock up on old computers, they may be worth a fortune.

BTW, Thank you Intel; as I'm currently in the market for a new computer - I'll make sure I see the "No Intel Inside!" sticker.
maxcypher
4.3 / 5 (3) Jan 05, 2011
Personally, I don't mind paying for the content I use for entertainment, so that aspect of the Sandy Bridge isn't an issue for me. On the other hand, like QC, I'm skeptical of their claim that the chip can beat the grafix card enhanced computer in processing video.
RayW
5 / 5 (6) Jan 05, 2011
The video output can be split to a digital input and recorded with the recorded file going P2P.

Simular to the copy protected music CDs released a few years back. A $3 patch cord circumvented the multi-million copy protection investment.
Decimatus
5 / 5 (5) Jan 05, 2011
I don't see how one chip with only 1.16 billion transistors could possibly out perform a system with a seperate video card, which top of the line cards have 384 to 1600 processor cores and 1 to 1.5 gigabytes of RAM.

How can this one chip possibly do the same job with less than 1/3rd as many transistors, while still doing everything than the CPU normally does just as well?


You gain significant efficiencies having these items on the same chip. But it isn't quite about replacing billion transistor video cards. Sandy Bridge will start small by processing streaming video and low end graphics at a more efficient rate, with power gamers still requiring massive video cards to play their games.

Most of Sandy Bridge's gains will be in the mobile/laptop/tablet markets, where power efficiency and low end graphics is the norm.

The way the market is going, Intel wil eventually buy Nvidia and compete with AMD/ATI using ever more elaborate and powerful CPU/graphic combo chips.
plaasjaapie
1.3 / 5 (3) Jan 05, 2011
I wouldn't worry too much. Intel has been making a bunch of tries at breaking into the graphics market. They've yet to come out with a decent chipset.
dirk_bruere
5 / 5 (5) Jan 05, 2011
I'll just wait until tech savvy pirates rip it and dump it on torrent. The only people this will inconvenience are the honest.
Jotaf
5 / 5 (5) Jan 05, 2011
The video is going to your monitor through a DVI cable anyway, uncompressed and unencrypted. What stops a tech-savvy person from recording that? You can tap into the data at any point during the transmission process.

Just like when they allow people to listen to music through a website with a specialized player (for instance, using Flash, like MySpace and other sites), the moment it goes through your speakers, it can be captured, with some simple software (Windows' own Sound Recorder) or hardware, if it gets to that. The bottomline is that you can't prevent duplication of data that is presented to a user. I bet someone finds a way to circumvent this in the first 24h.

Also, they really have to push this in all of their products if they want people to use it, because no one would choose a DRM-rid piece of hardware over a regular one. And if competitors come with a half-decent alternative they'll gain a hefty market share.
trekgeek1
4.9 / 5 (9) Jan 06, 2011
The video is going to your monitor through a DVI cable anyway, uncompressed and unencrypted. What stops a tech-savvy person from recording that? You can tap into the data at any point during the transmission process.


Look up "analog hole" on Wikipedia. The best they can ever do is temporarily stop pirating. Pirating will always win in the end. Any system can be broken. The question they should be asking themselves is whether the cost of these security features is worth it? If you deducted the cost of these anti-piracy measures from your content, more people will buy it legally. Instead of spending millions on DRM's, make iTunes songs 25 cents, or Blu Rays 5 bucks standard. They need to realize that the movie and music industry just won't make as much money. No more 30 million dollar salaries for actors. Give them 200,000 dollars for pretend time. That's a great salary for something that requires little to no education, no manual labor, lots of fame and admiration.
mjesfahani
not rated yet Jan 06, 2011
Viva Intel
EvgenijM
5 / 5 (2) Jan 06, 2011
Guess 2008 will be the last year I bought an intel CPU. Arm Denver from NVidia - here we go.
Quantum_Conundrum
3.7 / 5 (3) Jan 06, 2011
No more 30 million dollar salaries for actors. Give them 200,000 dollars for pretend time. That's a great salary for something that requires little to no education, no manual labor, lots of fame and admiration.


that would be so awesome if we could get sports clowns and hollywood clowns down to 200k per year, instead of the 15 to 30 million per year they are currently stealing.

"He who robs from the poor and he that gives to the rich shall both come to want."

It's complete idiocy how we keep pumping more and more money into multi-millionaire actors and atheletes.
NameIsNotNick
5 / 5 (1) Jan 06, 2011
that would be so awesome if we could get sports clowns and hollywood clowns down to 200k per year, instead of the 15 to 30 million per year they are currently stealing.


Won't happen. How would they pay their drug dealers?
El_Nose
4 / 5 (2) Jan 06, 2011
@QC

so let say tomorrow they drop all salaries to like 200k... well then all those people who play sports and act in films are saying -- i get 200k for doing a job and the company makes 400M -- I deserve more and then we have strikes again -- and you know what I can't blame them... cause someone is going to get paid no matter what -- do you really think movie tickets and sporting event tickets are going to go down in price??? that is consumer driven
trekgeek1
5 / 5 (3) Jan 06, 2011
@QC

so let say tomorrow they drop all salaries to like 200k... well then all those people who play sports and act in films are saying -- i get 200k for doing a job and the company makes 400M -- I deserve more and then we have strikes again -- and you know what I can't blame them... cause someone is going to get paid no matter what -- do you really think movie tickets and sporting event tickets are going to go down in price??? that is consumer driven


The whole point is that the studios would take home smaller profits. If they chose to keep higher revenues at the expense of the actors salaries and product pricing, then we will just keep pirating their content until they dissolve.
winthrom
5 / 5 (3) Jan 06, 2011
I do not mind paying for content, nor do I mind the actors getting filthy rich for their work. I do mind some of the stupid "security" plans created to make me buy the same content over and over again like the DVD players that have "location" control built in. So if I go to Australia, or Europe, and buy a DVD, it may not play on my US bought DVD player. This is criminal market manipulation. "Combination in restraint of trade".
dtxx
5 / 5 (3) Jan 06, 2011
Countdown to sandy bridge copy protection scheme being cracked, or found to impinge on legitimate fair use.
Jotaf
5 / 5 (4) Jan 06, 2011
I'm just not seeing the advantage to the user. They're trying to push some "other processing abilities" with this, but they haven't convinced me that these can't be offloaded to another processor without DRM.

Football players making lots of money -- people are willing to pay a lot for their tickets. If you go to the games you can't really complain, as you're contributing to their wealth with your hard-earned salary! Just don't go :)

The music industry needs to switch to another revenue model, people are no longer willing to pay a lot for music that can be easily copied and distributed. They are, however, willing to pay a lot for live performances. That's a reasonable way to support your favorite band in my opinion.
Yarus
5 / 5 (1) Jan 08, 2011
It seems like we are never going to have a world like Star Trek, where people do what's right because it's right, and humans share knowledge and technology for their own good, instead of abuses like this.

It seems like in the future we are going to be stuck with "the corporation," like in the Aliens movie, which owns everything and tells everyone what to do, and pretty much just values profits over human life.


You must remember what they did in star trek to get there....eliminate money and thus the control imposed by corporate and private wealth.
Eric_B
not rated yet Jan 08, 2011
They didn't eliminate money and commodities in Star Trek. They eliminated poverty and disease, freeing the population to create a world that they desired to live in.
StarDust21
5 / 5 (1) Jan 09, 2011
what the hell? CPU implemented copyright protection??
what the fuck. I've always bought intel but it looks like I will switch AMD...
Government to take away internet neutrality, wikileaks getting gang banged by US corps for doing totally legal stuff, now intel trying to gain control of our home computers....
nevdka
5 / 5 (1) Jan 09, 2011
Wow... looks like we will only be able to watch HD quality movies online if we get new computers. Or download a ripped blu-ray disc, like anyone can do already... How is this supposed to stop piracy again?
Eikka
not rated yet Jan 11, 2011

Look up "analog hole" on Wikipedia.


That's why bluray discs have the option of not allowing analog output, and why new players don't come with analog circuitry.

Same thing will happen to DVI output as well, since it's' unencrypted and slowly being made obsolete by HDMI and DisplayPort that support content encryption.

The only "analog hole" you have then is to video the video off the screen, which is obviously a bad solution.
poof
not rated yet Jan 20, 2011
Looks like their on track to implement a complete control ecosystem. Wont be long till we have big businesses telling us what we can and cannot do on our own computers. Hell why stop there, might as well start manufacturing mice that shock you when you look at something they dont like, that'll show us!

DVI(wikipedia):

In December 2010, Intel, AMD, and several computer and display manufacturers would stop supporting DVI-I, VGA and LVDS-technologies (i.e., IEEE 1394/Firewire) from 2013/2015, and instead speed up the adoption of DisplayPort and/or HDMI[7]. They also stated: "Legacy interfaces such as VGA, DVI and LVDS have not kept pace, and newer standards such as DisplayPort and HDMI clearly provide the best connectivity options moving forward. In our opinion, DisplayPort 1.2 is the future interface for PC monitors, along with HDMI 1.4a for TV connectivity."
trekgeek1
not rated yet Jan 20, 2011
They didn't eliminate money and commodities in Star Trek. They eliminated poverty and disease, freeing the population to create a world that they desired to live in.


Yes, they did. Watch Star Trek first contact. Captain Picard states "you see, in the future, money doesn't exist. We work to better ourselves and the rest of humanity".
trekgeek1
not rated yet Jan 20, 2011

Look up "analog hole" on Wikipedia.


That's why bluray discs have the option of not allowing analog output, and why new players don't come with analog circuitry.

Same thing will happen to DVI output as well, since it's' unencrypted and slowly being made obsolete by HDMI and DisplayPort that support content encryption.

The only "analog hole" you have then is to video the video off the screen, which is obviously a bad solution.


No, one way or another the pixels are decrypted. If you want to display them on a screen they must be decrypted. Just hijack the signal right before it goes to the display.