Google launches global kids science fair

Jan 11, 2011
Dutch children get a demonstration in how to blow big bubbles during a science festival in Amsterdam. Google has launched its first ever global science fair for young people aged 13 to 18, with the grand prize being a trip to the Galapagos Islands and a $50,000 scholarship.

Google on Tuesday launched its first ever global science fair for young people aged 13 to 18, with the grand prize being a trip to the Galapagos Islands and a 50,000-dollar scholarship.

"Google is looking for the brightest young scientists from around the world to submit interesting, creative projects that are relevant to the world today," the Internet said.

Students may enter on their own or in groups of two or three. Projects must be submitted by April 4.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.

As part of the entry, young scientists must create "either a two-minute video or 20-slide presentation giving an overview of your project and embed it on the summary page of your project submission," Google said.

All materials must be written in English, it said, noting that Google Translate is available for those who need it.

Judging of all submissions is to be done by a panel of teachers, Google said.

Then, in early May, "60 global semifinalists will be announced and their projects will be posted online and open to public voting for a 'People’s Choice Award.'"

Lonely George -- the last giant turtle from the Pinta Island, in captivity at the Galapagos National Park. Google has launched its first ever global science fair for young people aged 13 to 18, with the grand prize being a trip to the Galapagos Islands and a $50,000 scholarship.

Later in May, Google will announce 15 global finalists who will be flown to headquarters in California for a science fair event and judging before "a panel of acclaimed scientists including Nobel Laureates, tech visionaries and household names."

One finalist will be selected from each of three age groups: 13-14, 15-15, and 17-18.

Finalists win a 25,000 scholarship, and the grand prize winner gets a 50,000 dollar plus a 10-day trip with a parent or guardian to the with National Geographic Expeditions.

Explore further: Twitter rules out Turkey office amid tax row

More information: www.google.com/events/sciencefair/

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Twitter rules out Turkey office amid tax row

13 hours ago

Social networking company Twitter on Wednesday rejected demands from the Turkish government to open an office there, following accusations of tax evasion and a two-week ban on the service.

How does false information spread online?

16 hours ago

Last summer the World Economic Forum (WEF) invited its 1,500 council members to identify top trends facing the world, including what should be done about them. The WEF consists of 80 councils covering a wide range of issues including social media. Members come ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Microsoft CEO is driving data-culture mindset

(Phys.org) —Microsoft's future strategy: is all about leveraging data, from different sources, coming together using one cohesive Microsoft architecture. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on Tuesday, both in ...

Floating nuclear plants could ride out tsunamis

When an earthquake and tsunami struck the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant complex in 2011, neither the quake nor the inundation caused the ensuing contamination. Rather, it was the aftereffects—specifically, ...

Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

(Phys.org) —A report from Patent Bolt brings us one step closer to what Google may have in mind in developing smart contact lenses. According to the discussion Google is interested in the concept of contact ...

Quantenna promises 10-gigabit Wi-Fi by next year

(Phys.org) —Quantenna Communications has announced that it has plans for releasing a chipset that will be capable of delivering 10Gbps WiFi to/from routers, bridges and computers by sometime next year. ...