Give up smoking for good with tips from Loyola doctor

Jan 05, 2011

If you’re a smoker wanting to get off to a healthier start this new year, Loyola University Health System will co-host a free smoking-cessation workshop to help you kick the habit.

“The clinic is for everybody and their loved ones who is interested in the hazards of smoking, the advantages of quitting and how to go about quitting because smoking is the toughest addiction to give up next to cocaine. It’s a very powerful addiction,” said Dr. Angelos Halaris, a Loyola psychiatrist who will be participating in the clinic.

The clinic will take place at 5 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 19, at the Maywood Public Library, 121 S. Fifth Ave., Maywood. The clinic will last about an hour and will end with a short Q&A. Light refreshments will be served. The clinic will include:

• Information on quitting and treatment options from a coach trained and certified as a tobacco-treatment specialist.

• Insights from a smoker who has quit with the help of a prescription treatment option and support.

• Helpful ideas on where to turn for support.

• Strategies to prevent a return to smoking.

• Advice to help you speak with your doctor and set a quit date.

• Follow-up assistance for those wanting to quit.

“This is an educational event,” said Halaris, who specializes in smoking cessation. “We’re reaching out to the community and we want to educate the community about the health risks of .”

Explore further: CDC charges Johns Hopkins to lead development of Ebola training module

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Not ready to quit? Try cutting back

Dec 07, 2006

In a review article in the December Nicotine and Tobacco Research, researchers at the University of Vermont have found an unexpected, effective alternative to motivate smokers to quit smoking – cutting back. According to ...

The Great American Smokeout

Nov 17, 2010

You already know smoking is bad, and that it contributes to heart disease, strokes, lung and other cancers and can lead to poor healing, chronic lung disease, wrinkled skin, erectile dysfunction, and it worsens asthma.

Recommended for you

Study reveals state of crisis in Canadian foster care system

Oct 24, 2014

A new study of foster care in Canada led by a researcher at Western University reveals a shrinking number of foster care providers are available across the country to care for a growing number of children with increasingly ...

Researchers prove the benefits of persimmons for diet

Oct 24, 2014

Alba Mir and Ana Domingo, researchers from the Department of Analytical Chemistry of the University of Valencia, under the supervision of professors Miguel de la Guardia and Maria Luisa Cervera, from the same department, ...

Hand blenders used for cooking can emit persistent chemicals

Oct 24, 2014

Eight out of twelve tested models of hand blenders are leaking chlorinated paraffins when used according to the suppliers' instructions. This is revealed in a report from Stockholm University where researchers analyzed a ...

User comments : 0