Chilean scientists seek alcoholism vaccine

Jan 06, 2011

Chilean researchers said Thursday they are developing a vaccine against alcoholism that could be tested on humans starting next year and works by neutralizing an enzyme that metabolizes alcohol.

The genetic therapy is based on , a group of enzymes that metabolize and are thus responsible for , said Juan Asenjo, who heads a team of researchers at Chile's Faculty of Sciences and Mathematics and the private lab Recalcine.

About 20 percent of the Asian population lacks this enzyme and thus experience "such a strong reaction that it discourages consumption," he added.

The vaccine would similarly increase unease, nausea and tachycardia (accelerated heart beat).

"With the vaccine, the desire to consume alcohol will be greatly reduced thanks to these reactions," Asenjo told Radio Cooperativa.

Researchers have already successfully tested the on rats who were dependent on alcohol, and got them to halve their consumption.

"The idea is to have 90-95 percent reduction of consumption for humans," Asenjo said.

It would work like patches or pills that help smokers kick the habit, but with better efficiency by specifically targeting liver cells and avoiding collateral effects on all cells.

This year, researchers plan to focus on mass production of virus cells and conduct tests on animals to determine proper dosage before launching human tests in 2012.

In October, US researchers announced they had discovered a gene variation known as CYP2EI that can protect against alcoholism and could lead to a preventative treatment.

The known as CYP2EI is linked to people's response to alcohol, and for 10 to 20 percent of people who have it, just a few glasses leads them to feeling more drunk than the rest of the population, said University of North Carolina researchers at the Chapel Hill School of Medicine

This CYP2EI gene -- located in the brain, not the liver -- has long been known to hold an enzyme for metabolizing alcohol, and generates molecules known as free radicals. But a specific variant of the gene makes people more sensitive to alcohol, according to University of North Carolina researchers.

Drugs that can be created to induce the CYP2E1 gene could eventually make people more sensitive to or help sober them up if they have had to much, according to that research team.

Explore further: Study examines FDA influence on design of pivotal drug studies

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Scientists find gene linked to alcoholism

Oct 19, 2010

Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine have discovered a gene variant that may protect against alcoholism.

Scientists identify gene that influences alcohol consumption

Dec 05, 2007

A variant of a gene involved in communication among brain cells has a direct influence on alcohol consumption in mice, according to a new study by scientists supported by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism ...

Alcohol tolerance 'switch' found

Oct 21, 2009

Researchers at North Carolina State University have found a genetic "switch" in fruit flies that plays an important role in making flies more tolerant to alcohol.

Gene mutation in worms key to alcohol tolerance

Oct 22, 2008

(PhysOrg.com) -- The work follows a study carried out by Oregon Health and Science University, which suggested a link between a gene mutation in mice and tolerance to alcohol. Researchers at Liverpool have ...

Recommended for you

Powdered measles vaccine found safe in early clinical trials

19 hours ago

A measles vaccine made of fine dry powder and delivered with a puff of air triggered no adverse side effects in early human testing and it is likely effective, according to a paper to be published November 28 in the journal ...

Health care M&A leads global deal surge

Nov 23, 2014

In a big year for deal making, the health care industry is a standout. Large drugmakers are buying and selling businesses to control costs and deploy surplus cash. A rising stock market, tax strategies and ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.