CDC: Seat belt use reaches 85 percent

Jan 04, 2011

(AP) -- Nearly six in seven U.S. adults now wear seat belts, an increase in driver safety that health officials say has helped cut motor vehicle deaths and injuries.

About 85 percent of adults said they wear seat belts in a 2008 survey, up from under 81 percent in 2002. Only 11 percent wore them in 1982, before the first state law requiring seat belt use.

The also reported Tuesday a decline of more than 15 percent in non-fatal injuries from 2001 to 2009. The government previously reported traffic fatalities fell in 2009 to 33,808, the lowest number since 1950.

CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden has designated auto injuries as one of his six "winnable battle" priorities.

Explore further: Jamaica Senate starts debate on pot decriminalization bill

More information: CDC report: http://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Jamaica Senate starts debate on pot decriminalization bill

11 hours ago

Jamaica's Senate on Friday started debating a bill that would decriminalize possession of small amounts of pot and establish a licensing agency to regulate a lawful medical marijuana industry on the island where the drug ...

Can Lean Management improve hospitals?

17 hours ago

Waiting times in hospital emergency departments could be cut with the introduction of Lean Management and Six Sigma techniques according to new research.

Research finds 90 percent of home chefs contaminate food

18 hours ago

If you're gearing up for a big Super Bowl bash, you might want to consult the best food-handling practices before preparing that feast. New research from Kansas State University finds that most home chefs drop the ball on ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.