CDC: Seat belt use reaches 85 percent

January 4, 2011

(AP) -- Nearly six in seven U.S. adults now wear seat belts, an increase in driver safety that health officials say has helped cut motor vehicle deaths and injuries.

About 85 percent of adults said they wear seat belts in a 2008 survey, up from under 81 percent in 2002. Only 11 percent wore them in 1982, before the first state law requiring seat belt use.

The also reported Tuesday a decline of more than 15 percent in non-fatal injuries from 2001 to 2009. The government previously reported traffic fatalities fell in 2009 to 33,808, the lowest number since 1950.

CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden has designated auto injuries as one of his six "winnable battle" priorities.

Explore further: A car's middle back seat may be least desirable, but it's the safest

More information: CDC report: http://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns

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