Breastfeeding -- added protection for cancer survivors?

Jan 20, 2011
This is the cover of the Journal of Cancer Survivorship. Credit: Springer / Heidelberg

Women who have survived childhood cancer should be advised to breastfeed if they can, in order to offset some of the negative health effects of their earlier cancer treatment. According to Susan Ogg and colleagues from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, making women aware of the benefits of breastfeeding should be part of routine post-cancer diet and healthy lifestyle recommendations. Their work is published online in Springer's Journal of Cancer Survivorship.

It is estimated that one in every 640 young adults between the ages of 20 and 39 will be a survivor of childhood cancer, largely due to the progress in . Specifically, 80 percent of children and adolescents treated with modern cancer therapies now survive. This growing number of cancer survivors faces significant health challenges, including a variety of adverse effects of the cancer itself and its treatment. These late effects include impaired growth and development, organ dysfunction, reproductive difficulties as well as increased risk of cancer re-occurrence.

It is well established that breastfeeding confers a number of health benefits to both infants and their mothers. Ogg and team looked at whether breastfeeding might result in the same benefits to women who have survived childhood cancer.

They reviewed existing research looking at whether women can successfully breastfeed after cancer treatment in childhood, the long-term effects of early cancer treatment on women's health in general and how breastfeeding may help to reduce both the risk and impact of cancer-related toxicity in those who survive.

They found that breastfeeding had the potential to influence positively bone mineral density, risk factors, cardiovascular disease and secondary tumors - conditions negatively affected by childhood cancer.

Ogg and colleagues conclude: "Alongside advice to eat plenty of fruit and vegetables, abstain from smoking, use suitable sun protection, practice safe sex and take part in regular physical activity, women who have survived and are physically able to breastfeed, should be actively encouraged to do so to help protect them against the many lasting effects of ."

Explore further: Cancer: Tumors absorb sugar for mobility

More information: Ogg SW et al (2011). Protective effects of breastfeeding for mothers surviving childhood cancer. Journal of Cancer Survivorship. DOI:10.1007/s11764-010-0169-z

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Cancer: Tumors absorb sugar for mobility

4 hours ago

Cancer cells are gluttons. We have long known that they monopolize large amounts of sugar. More recently, it became clear that some tumor cells are also characterized by a series of features such as mobility or unlikeliness ...

Early hormone therapy may be safe for women's hearts

14 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Healthy women at low risk of cardiovascular disease may be able to take hormone replacement therapy soon after menopause for a short time without harming their hearts, according to a new study.

Low yield for repeat colonoscopy in some patients

14 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Repeat colonoscopies within 10 years are of little benefit to patients who had no polyps found on adequate examination; however, repeat colonoscopies do benefit patients when the baseline examination was compromised, ...

Cell's recycling center implicated in division decisions

17 hours ago

Most cells do not divide unless there is enough oxygen present to support their offspring, but certain cancer cells and other cell types circumvent this rule. Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University have now identified ...

User comments : 0