Making batteries last longer in electric vehicles

Jan 10, 2011

A potentially ‘green’ energy storage device which will help to power electric transport is to be officially launched at The University of Nottingham’s Malaysia Campus (UNMC) this week.

The Sahz-UNMC produces ‘supercapacitors’ which are electrochemical storage devices with high power density. They are used to improve the lifetime of the batteries in electric vehicles.

The plant has developed the new supercapacitors under the brand name Enerstora. They are cost-saving and more environmentally-friendly when used in the manufacturing of electric cars, trains and other electric transportation. The supercapacitor also has important applications in other areas like solar energy and mobile devices where extremely fast charging is a valuable feature.

The unit was established by the UNMC Faculty of Engineering with industry partner Sahz Holdings to design and manufacture the devices with the eventual aim of building a high volume manufacturing plant in Malaysia. The fabrication process for this new technology was developed in collaboration with the Chemical Engineering Department at the University Park campus in Nottingham, UK.

The plant is sponsored by the Malaysian government and the country’s former Prime Minister, Tun Mahathir, will conduct the official opening on Tuesday 11 January 2011. The event will also see the signing of a memorandum of understanding between Sahz and two future partners, 2M Engineering of the Netherlands and Semyung Ever Energy Co.Ltd of South Korea.

Electric vehicles and ‘green’ cars will account for up to a third of total global sales by 2020, according to a recent report from Deloitte's global manufacturing industry group. At present most electric vehicle batteries typically need replacing every three to five years. The motivation for establishing the pilot plant was to develop the supercapacitor which will extend and maximise the life of the batteries to help conserve the natural environment and global energy resources.

A low state of charge leads to sulphurication and stratification, both of which shorten the life of the cell. Short battery life is caused by continuous draining and charging which has a detrimental effect on the battery. By using the new supercapacitor-battery hybrid technology for energy storage in the battery life can be lengthened, the battery size reduced and a higher state of charge can be maintained for a longer period of time.

The pilot plant is now manufacturing Electronic Double Layer Capacitors (EDLCs) in a reproducible and economically viable way. Historically it has been difficult to scale up production to economically viable levels without losing quality and performance of the product because the equipment and processes in a large plant are significantly different to a pilot plant. The Sahz-UNMC plant is also aiming to design a system capable of predicting the yield and quality of the product when it is eventually manufactured on a large scale.

At the launch and signing ceremony Malaysia’s former Prime Minister Tun Mahathir will be given a guided tour of the lab facilities. Leading the pilot plant at UNMC, Professor Dino Isa said:

“The project is one which is leading the market. We are gambling on the demise of hydrocarbon driven vehicles and the eventual emergence of the pure electric vehicle as the dominant means of transport in the next ten years.

“We are also looking to capitalize on the popularity of mobile devices which, as platforms and technologies converge, will require energy storage systems to deliver pulsed voltage and current that drains and eventually kills normal batteries if unaided by a supercapacitor integrated within the system. We thank the Malaysian Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation (MOSTI) and Sahz for their trust and insight, I personally thank the University for providing me with an environment conducive to inquisitive research, my students for their patience and hard work and not least Prof George Chen for his input during the initial stages of the project."

Explore further: Cook farm waste into energy

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New Hitachi Li-ion batteries to last ten years

Apr 09, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Hitachi has announced they may be able to double the life of rechargeable lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries through the development of a new cathode material. The material was developed in conjunction ...

Toyota to release solar charger for electric vehicles

Oct 27, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Toyota is developing a solar charging station for electric cars and plug-in hybrids, making a green technology even greener. It has also designed a battery charger for mounting inside an electric ...

Recommended for you

Cook farm waste into energy

15 hours ago

It takes some cooking, but turning farm waste into biofuels is now possible and makes economic sense, according to preliminary research from the University of Guelph.

Developing a reliable wind 'super grid' for Europe

18 hours ago

EU researchers are involved in the development of a pan-European 'super grid' capable of dispersing wind power across Member States. This will bring more renewable energy into homes and businesses, help reduce ...

Boeing 737 factory to move to clean energy

Dec 16, 2014

Boeing said Tuesday it plans to buy renewable energy credits to replace fossil-fuel power at the factory in Washington state where it assembles its 737 commercial airplanes.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

flying_finn
not rated yet Jan 18, 2011
Great news! Anyone heard more about lithium titanate development for fast charging developed for the US Navy to reduce generator redundancies and power companies' surge issues?

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.