Taiwan scientists claim microchip 'breakthrough'

December 14, 2010
United Microelectronics Corp (UMC) engineers push trollies at a factory in southern Taiwan. Taiwanese scientists have unveiled an advanced microchip technology which they claimed marks a breakthrough in piling ever more memory into ever smaller spaces. Taiwan is among the top four microchip producers in the world.

Taiwanese scientists on Tuesday unveiled an advanced microchip technology which they claimed marks a breakthrough in piling ever more memory into ever smaller spaces.

The scientists said they had succeeded in producing a circuit measuring just nine nanometres across.

"Researchers used to believe that 20 nanometres was the limit for microchip technologies," said Ho Chia-hua, who heads the team behind the project at the state-run National Nano Device Laboratories.

A chip using the new memory technology has about 20 times the of memory units now available on the market and consumes just one 200th of the electricity, the scientists said.

The benefits of greater memory and reduced are highly sought in the manufacture of like and tablet computers.

Using such technology, a chip the size of one square centimetre will be capable of storing one million pictures or 100 hours of 3D movies, said Yang Fu-liang, the director general of the Laboratories.

However, Nobunaga Chai, an analyst of the Taipei-based electronics market research unit Digitimes, said it would be some time before anyone could start making money on the technology.

"I'm afraid it will take several years before the advanced technology can be turned into commercial use," he told AFP.

Taiwan is among the top four microchip producers in the world.

Explore further: Samsung unveils world's first 16-gigabit NAND flash memory chip

Related Stories

Samsung Develops 2Gb Flash Memory Using 60nm Process

June 30, 2006

Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., the world leader in advanced memory technology, announced today that it has successfully developed a faster and higher capacity version of the world's fastest memory chip.-- OneNAND TM -- while ...

Samsung Develops First 50nm DRAM Chip

October 23, 2006

Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., the world leader in advanced memory technology, announced today that it has developed the industry’s first 50-nanometer (nm) DDR2 DRAM (dynamic random access memory) chip, which will increase ...

SanDisk, Toshiba Develop 32-nanometer NAND Flash Technology

February 11, 2009

SanDisk and Toshiba today announced the co-development of multi-level cell (MLC) NAND flash memory using 32-nanometer process technology to produce a 32-gigabit (Gb) 3-bits-per-cell (X3) memory chip. The breakthrough introduction ...

Taiwan unveils super-tiny microchip

December 16, 2009

Taiwan has developed tiny microchips that could lead to lighter and cheaper laptops or mobile phones, researchers and observers said Wednesday.

Recommended for you

How to curb emissions? Put a price on carbon

September 3, 2015

Literally putting a price on carbon pollution and other greenhouse gasses is the best approach for nurturing the rapid growth of renewable energy and reducing emissions.

Customizing 3-D printing

September 3, 2015

The technology behind 3-D printing is growing more and more common, but the ability to create designs for it is not. Any but the simplest designs require expertise with computer-aided design (CAD) applications, and even for ...

2 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

lexington
not rated yet Dec 14, 2010
Why the skepticism, exactly?
dirk_bruere
not rated yet Dec 14, 2010
Because nobody can mass produce chips with features below about 22nm at present. Even that is pushing it.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.