Changes in solar activity affect local climate

Dec 08, 2010

Raimund Muscheler is a researcher at the Department of Earth and Ecosystem Sciences at Lund University in Sweden. In the latest issue of the journal Science, he and his colleagues have described how the surface water temperature in the tropical parts of the eastern Pacific varied with the sun's activity between 7 000 and 11 000 years ago (early Holocene). Contrary to what one might intuitively believe, high solar activity had a cooling effect in this region.

"It is perhaps a similar phenomenon that we are seeing here today", says Raimund Muscheler. "Last year's cold winter in Sweden could intuitively be seen to refute global warming. But the winter in Greenland was exceptionally mild. Both phenomena coincide with low solar activity and the sun's activity probably influences the local climate variations."

Today there is a lot of debate about whether the sun's activity could have influenced the earth's climate over thousands or millions of years.

"The key processes in this influence are still mostly unclear. This is why the present probably do not include the full effect of solar activity", says Raimund Muscheler.

By reconstructing surface water temperatures from plankton stored in a sediment core taken from the seabed off the west coast of Baja California Sur, Mexico, researchers have now made new findings. The results suggest that solar activity has influenced the sea's surface water temperature by changing local circulation processes in the sea. Previous studies have shown that the surface water temperature in the tropical Pacific Ocean is linked to atmospheric and seawater circulation through the regional weather phenomena El Niño and El Niña.

"We know that El Niño brings a warmer climate, while El Niña brings a cooler in the eastern part of the Pacific Ocean", says Raimund Muscheler. "If we presume that this connection existed during the early Holocene, this means that there could be a link between solar activity and El Niño/El Niña on long time scales."

In his research, Raimund Muscheler works to reconstruct previous changes in solar activity by studying how cosmogenic isotopes, for example of beryllium-10 and carbon-14, have been stored in both ice cores and annual rings in trees. Cosmogenic isotopes are formed in the atmosphere as a result of cosmic radiation from space. When solar activity is high, a small amount of the cosmic radiation reaches the atmosphere and thus a small number of cosmogenic isotopes are formed and stored.

"This is the best and most reliable method we have to reconstruct ", says Raimund Muscheler.

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User comments : 12

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geokstr
2.3 / 5 (6) Dec 08, 2010
"Last year's cold winter in Sweden could intuitively be seen to refute global warming. But the winter in Greenland was exceptionally mild. Both phenomena coincide with low solar activity..."

Huh?

Low solar activity caused Sweden to be colder and Greenland to be warmer. Is there nothing that Global Climate Disruption models can't prove?

Everything is now blamed on this BS - colder, warmer, more storms, less storms, etc ad nauseum.

Climate Change cannot be falsified by anything anymore, a key proof that this is now a religion.
Claudius
2.3 / 5 (6) Dec 09, 2010
I'm still scratching my head to figure out how the sun can avoid affecting the whole planet. What mechanism is involved to confine the sun's effect to only local areas?
geokstr
1 / 5 (2) Dec 09, 2010
I'm still scratching my head to figure out how the sun can avoid affecting the whole planet. What mechanism is involved to confine the sun's effect to only local areas?

A mechanism called the Religion of Leftism.
Skeptic_Heretic
5 / 5 (2) Dec 09, 2010
No ladies. What this research says, if you'd actually care to read it, is that solar insolation doesn't have a gross effect on local or regional climate. The input of more energy into an area doesn't necessarily mean that area will be warmer. There are many more mechanics involved, like heat and energy transport, ground cover, albedo, etc.

After all, isn't it your side of the discussion that keeps saying climate is too difficult to construct a simple model of? This research would actually support your point, if you seriously gave a shit about what you were saying and read it. Or you can ignore me and continue on with your FOX news talking points, your choice.
geokstr
1.8 / 5 (5) Dec 09, 2010
After all, isn't it your side of the discussion that keeps saying climate is too difficult to construct a simple model of? This research would actually support your point, if you seriously gave a shit about what you were saying and read it. Or you can ignore me and continue on with your FOX news talking points, your choice.

We really do know that this research supports our side, and that it does not support yours. As usual, you cannot seem to recoqnize sarcasm directed at your views, because you, and all leftists, have no sense of humor whatsoever, unless it is used to insult and ridicule your opponents.

It is getting tiresome responding to such ignorance, after rebutting exactly the same points for ten years on the internet. It makes no difference how many times we refute leftist arguments, they just keep using the same ones anyway.

In almost every way, leftist argument and logic resembles that of its mortal enemy - creationists. You are now on my to-be-ignored list.
Skeptic_Heretic
3 / 5 (2) Dec 09, 2010
In almost every way, leftist argument and logic resembles that of its mortal enemy - creationists. You are now on my to-be-ignored list.
Oh good, so at least you're consistent. Generalizing and ignoring facts, yep, that's your MO.
GSwift7
1 / 5 (1) Dec 09, 2010
I think you guys are taking this clown too seriously. We need to check his diploma or something. If he's seriously spent the past however many years studying El Nino and La Nina, but still calls it El Nina then I'm not sure all the lights on this Christmas tree are lit. The first time I thought, okay a typo, but he did it several more times. lol. Kidding.

The key processes in this influence are still mostly unclear


As Skeptic suggests, keep that part in mind. This does back up similar results of another study I read not too long ago on this site though. Bear in mind that he's using proxy data to reconstruct solar data, and it's extremely difficult to either verify or discredit how accurate his proxy is. Then I assume he's comparing his proxy for solar activity to someone else's proxy for temperature conditions. That could be off as well, and is equally difficult to verify. If I were a modeler I don't think I'd rewrite my model code based on this. Not yet anyway.
KwasniczJ
1 / 5 (3) Dec 10, 2010
IMO solar system is passing through dense cloud of antineutrinos (dark matter), which are accelerating decay of radioactive elements (potassium in particular), thus heating the oceans and Earth "from the bottom". The human activity is undeniable factor of GW here (compare the "rainy weekends") - but not quite significant. We should stop with fossil fuel burning anyway from apparent reasons: the risk of geopolitical instability due the energy crisis. We need the oil for production of plastic anyway, so we cannot burn it all.
KwasniczJ
1 / 5 (3) Dec 10, 2010
The solar activity is affecting the Earth climate at short period basis, but it's itself affected from outside. I presume, the motion of center of mass of solar system (defined with eleven years standing period of Jupiter planet in particular) switches the direction of solar plasma stream beneath solar surface, thus affecting the concentration of bubbles (sun spots) and solar flares. These flares are sources of solar wind particles, which are serving as a condensation nuclei of water droplets in atmosphere. But now this cycle is broken and the climate is changing across whole solar system - so we cannot atribute the changes of solar activity of it (correlation doesn't mean causation here). It's evident, these current changes have common origin, which is independent to solar activity.
KwasniczJ
1 / 5 (4) Dec 10, 2010
After all, the correlation of solar activity to terrestrial weather is unclear.

It's believed, the solar flares are decreasing the water content in atmosphere, thus causing droughts and continental character of climate. But water vapour is important greenhouse gas, so such flares should lead to global cooling instead by decreasing of water content in atmosphere and increasing its reflectivity with clouds formation (negative feedback). Whereas the droughts are causing the lover coverage of clouds of inland areas, thus decreasing the albedo of Earth (a positive feedback).

As the result, the changes in solar activity are making weather less pleasant definitely - but I'm not sure, whether they can contribute to global warming significantly, until they're not really intensive.
KwasniczJ
1 / 5 (4) Dec 10, 2010
Amazon Drought - River Hits New Low

http://news.natio...pictures
GSwift7
2.3 / 5 (3) Dec 13, 2010
Here are some interesting articles in relation to this story. This topic really intrigued me, so I've been doing some reading up on it. It seems that there are several highly disputed and competing theories in this area of climate study. It revolves around surface ocean feedback in terms of evoporation, ocean surface-to-deep circulation, top-of-atmosphere radiation, ENSO cycles, and a couple other factors that are all hard to model.

Here's one older article that talks about the competing theories:

http://www.ldeo.c...1996.pdf

And here's one of several recent studies that seem to lend strength to the ocean thermostat theories:

http://www.scienc...1918.htm

I think this is the location of the abstract to which the preceding story is refering, but I could be mistaken:

http://www.scienc...009/1378

In a nutshell, the ocean may limit change more than expected.

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