Potential vaccine to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV after birth to start trial

Dec 03, 2010

The Medical Research Council (MRC) together with researchers from Kenya, The Gambia, United States of America, Sweden, and Spain, has opened enrolment in two infant HIV vaccine trials, known collectively as PedVacc. These trials are examining the safety of a new type of HIV vaccine, MVA.HIVA, in infants.

The vaccine is called MVA.HIVA and was developed at the University of Oxford in England. The vaccine carrier called modified vaccine virus Ankara (MVA) is a weakened virus previously used as a . Small pieces of genes have been added to this, but the vaccine does not contain the whole HIV virus, and cannot cause or AIDS. MVA.HIVA is one component of a more complex future vaccine.

The MVA.HIVA vaccine has been previously tested in 13 studies in the UK and Africa, involving a total of 375 adult volunteers. There have been no serious reactions related to this vaccine. It is safe and well tolerated. Furthermore, the MVA component was administered to more than 120,000 vaccinees as part of the smallpox eradication programme, with no reported reactions, despite the deliberate vaccination of high-risk groups. More recently, a similar MVA-based vaccine for tuberculosis has been shown to be safe in in The Gambia.

The PedVacc studies are sponsored by the MRC and funded by the European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP). The trials are taking place in The Gambia and Kenya and will recruit in total 120 healthy, HIV-negative infants born to healthy, either HIV-positive or HIV-negative mothers. Both trials will entail a single injection into the muscle of infants aged 20 weeks.

Any HIV-positive women in this study will be provided with and extensive feeding counselling during pregnancy and while breastfeeding to reduce the risk of to their infants. Half of the infants in the study will be randomised to receive the MVA.HIVA study vaccine in addition to their regular childhood immunisations. The other half will only receive their regular immunisations, but not the study vaccine, and they will be compared to the vaccinated infants.

Importantly, parents must give consent for their child to participate in the study. The study has been reviewed and approved by local and international ethics and regulatory bodies.

Explore further: South African "Mentor Mothers" lower HIV infection rates among pregnant women

Provided by Medical Research Council

5 /5 (1 vote)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Smallpox vaccine alternative identified

Jan 07, 2008

University of California, Irvine infectious disease researchers have shown the effectiveness of a potential alternative to the existing smallpox vaccine that can replace the current biodefense stockpile for this lethal virus.

Human clinical trial of DNA-MVA HIV vaccine candidate begins

Sep 28, 2010

A Phase I study, called RV262, recently began to evaluate a combination DNA prime/MVA vector boost vaccine regimen that was developed to protect against diverse subtypes of HIV-1 prevalent in North America, Europe, Africa ...

Experimental aids vaccine now in production

Nov 12, 2008

(PhysOrg.com) -- The advance towards a vaccine for HIV/AIDS has taken another step closer to realization. A vaccine, developed by Dr. Chil-Yong Kang and his team at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry at The University ...

AIDS vaccine trial exceeds expectations

Sep 23, 2005

An experimental AIDS vaccine of Merck & Co. has exceeded expectations and led to a double enrollment in the trial to 3,000, researchers said.

How HIV vaccine might have increased odds of infection

Nov 03, 2008

In September 2007, a phase II HIV-1 vaccine trial was abruptly halted when researchers found that the vaccine may have promoted, rather than prevented, HIV infection. A new study by a team of researchers at the Montpellier ...

Puzzling results from HIV vaccine trial

Dec 03, 2007

A potential HIV vaccine that recently failed a clinical trial in the United States may increase some people's chance of catching the virus that causes AIDS.

Recommended for you

Obese British man in court fight for surgery

Jul 11, 2011

A British man weighing 22 stone (139 kilograms, 306 pounds) launched a court appeal Monday against a decision to refuse him state-funded obesity surgery because he is not fat enough.

2008 crisis spurred rise in suicides in Europe

Jul 08, 2011

The financial crisis that began to hit Europe in mid-2008 reversed a steady, years-long fall in suicides among people of working age, according to a letter published on Friday by The Lancet.

New food labels dished up to keep Europe healthy

Jul 06, 2011

A groundbreaking deal on compulsory new food labels Wednesday is set to give Europeans clear information on the nutritional and energy content of products, as well as country of origin.

Overweight men have poorer sperm count

Jul 04, 2011

Overweight or obese men, like their female counterparts, have a lower chance of becoming a parent, according to a comparison of sperm quality presented at a European fertility meeting Monday.

User comments : 0