Japan team says stem cells made paralysed monkey jump again

Dec 08, 2010
A young marmoset is carried by its father at the Amneville zoo, eastern France, June 2010. Japanese researchers said Wednesday they had used stem cells to restore partial mobility in a small marmoset that had been paralysed from the neck down by a spinal injury.

Japanese researchers said Wednesday they had used stem cells to restore partial mobility in a small monkey that had been paralysed from the neck down by a spinal injury.

"It is the world's first case in which a small-size primate recovered from a spinal injury using ," professor Hideyuki Okano of Tokyo's Keio University told AFP.

Okano's research team, which earlier helped a mouse recover its mobility in a similar treatment, injected so-called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into a paralysed marmoset, he said.

The team planted four types of into human skin cells to create the iPS cells, according to Kyodo News.

The injection was given on the ninth day after the injury, considered the most effective timing, and the monkey started to move its limbs again within two to three weeks, Okano said.

"After six weeks, the animal had recovered to the level where it was jumping around," he told AFP. "It was very close to the normal level."

"Its gripping strength on the forefeet also recovered to up to 80 percent."

Okano called the research project a major stride to pave the way for a similar medical technique to be used on humans.

Scientists say the use of human as a treatment for cancer and other diseases holds great promise, but the process has drawn fire from religious conservatives and others who oppose it.

Embryonic stem cell research is controversial because human embryos are destroyed in order to obtain the cells capable of developing into almost every tissue of the body.

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User comments : 11

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StarDust21
5 / 5 (4) Dec 08, 2010
I want a video of that monkey
LivaN
5 / 5 (4) Dec 08, 2010
Wow this research is amazing!
Bob_Kob
4 / 5 (12) Dec 08, 2010
Godamn religious nuts ruining possibly the best advancement in medical science..
Modernmystic
1 / 5 (8) Dec 08, 2010
Godamn religious nuts ruining possibly the best advancement in medical science..


Goddamn do-gooders of all kinds preventing the kind of research that went on in death camps in WW II. Imagine the kind of advancements we could get out of that kind of research.

You just don't ****ing get it, and you never will...

Take your holier than thou attitude and kindly shove it...hard...
SkiSci
5 / 5 (6) Dec 08, 2010
Godamn religious nuts ruining possibly the best advancement in medical science..


Goddamn do-gooders of all kinds preventing the kind of research that went on in death camps in WW II. Imagine the kind of advancements we could get out of that kind of research.

You just don't ****ing get it, and you never will...

Take your holier than thou attitude and kindly shove it...hard...


You drive me Bananas.

I see you've employed the slippery slope/straw man tactic in your argument.

A) First of all these stem cells were derived from an adult not a fetus. * See Induced pluripotent stem

B) Harvesting Stem cell related to the legal practice of abortions (although understandably controversial) is by no means akin to forcefully torturing poor souls in the pursuit of hack science.
heshkake
5 / 5 (1) Dec 08, 2010
This article is missing a better conclusion:

The use of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) means that baby/embroyic cells ARE NOT part of the process, thus putting out the moral fire our religous peers espouse.

This article needs to be edited. Second paragraph says induced pluripotent cells, last two paragraphs talk about embryonic stem cells.

No human embroyos destroyed. No controversy.

Fantastic work Okano and Team!
ArcainOne
5 / 5 (1) Dec 08, 2010
Goddamn do-gooders of all kinds preventing the kind of research that went on in death camps in WW II. Imagine the kind of advancements we could get out of that kind of research.


Funny... because we did... When you don't have to worry about ethics research proceeds quickly. On the flip side when misconceptions get in the way and the nay sayers label all your research unethical research that can help the entirety of the world comes to a halt. Fact, not all stem cells come from embryos. Do some research before you open your trap.
ArcainOne
2 / 5 (1) Dec 08, 2010
A) First of all these stem cells were derived from an adult not a fetus. * See Induced pluripotent stem

B) Harvesting Stem cell related to the legal practice of abortions (although understandably controversial) is by no means akin to forcefully torturing poor souls in the pursuit of hack science.


I have to agree on both points. Especially B. Honestly if you want to be upset be upset that these children died with out contributing anything, be upset that rather than using them for good we simply threw them away, that their existence (though brief) was waisted. However I will give you this... the whole growing in giant cloning vats... kind of unethical... The push to not use human embryonic stem cells was in my opinion a good one as we frantically went in search for other means to produce them. Bravo Scientists.
dtxx
4 / 5 (4) Dec 08, 2010
Goddamn do-gooders of all kinds preventing the kind of research that went on in death camps in WW II. Imagine the kind of advancements we could get out of that kind of research.



In the case of iPS lines all of your ethical concerns should be satisfied. In many cases this is where theists will insists that doing such things is an affront to the divine providence of the creator, men aren't meant to be gods, etc.

If an accident befall you, kindly stay crippled then. I assume that's what you are advocating for everyone else too?
newsreader
5 / 5 (3) Dec 08, 2010
It will be interesting to see how many people will suddenly change their stance on the use of ESCs when they find out their child or other loved one could walk again.
Sinister181
1 / 5 (1) Dec 12, 2010
Godamn religious nuts ruining possibly the best advancement in medical science..


Could not agree more. This is why it hasn't progressed into human trials. This research could help so many people, and yet, it's held back by "ethical" (religious) dilemmas.

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