Japan pitches mind-blowing high-tech 3D World Cup

Dec 01, 2010
Members of the Japanese delegation arrive to the FIFA headquarters in Zurich during the 2022 World Cup bid final presentation. Japan promised a high tech marvel in its final pitch to host the 2022 World Cup on Wednesday by paving 400 stadiums around the world with 3D flat screens to show life size matches thousands of miles away.

Japan promised a high tech marvel in its final pitch to host the 2022 World Cup on Wednesday by paving 400 stadiums around the world with 3D flat screens to show life size matches thousands of miles away.

"I have to admit that the idea of this blows my mind away," admitted Japan 2022 bid committee chief executive Kohzo Tashima.

"Three hundred and sixty million people could have a full stadium experience of matches; that's over 100 times the number of spectators at the 1994 World Cup in the United States," he told FIFA's executive committee.

Backed by Sony chairman Howard Stringer, Japanese officials mirrored the promise of an electronics revolution for the next generation that would eliminate language problems in Japan by providing tiny real-time interpretation machines and constant connection to palm sized screens.

But the highlight of the presentation a day before the grandees of world footballs' governing body -- some of whom are in their 80s -- choose the hosts, was the idea of paving whole pitches including Wembley or the legendary Maracana stadium with flat screens.

They would project real-time hologram-like of the game in life size and real time to crowds around the world.

"Our nation's bid is not about one nation hosting the games or two nations, but 208 regions and FIFA nations hosting the game together," said Junji Ogura, chairman of the Japanese bid and a member of FIFA's executive committee.

"Create a for the next generation to bring 208 smiles to the world," he urged his fellow footballing offocials.

Although the idea seemed far fetched, Stringer insisted it was as realistic as the steps taken when the Walkman portable music player, home video cameras, or PlayStation were launched

"The truth is the world is changing faster than any of us can understand," the Sony chief explained.

"I can tell you that this is not science fiction, in 2022 this will be science fact," Stringer insisted, dressed in a Japan football jersey.

Japanese sports minister Kan Suzuki said the government was ready to give "absolute guarantees" not only for the political and financial pledges, but also the technological promise.

Ogura said: "The challenge for FIFA, for football, is to identify the next big idea."

Japan is vying with more traditional bids from Australia, the United States, Qatar, and South Korea to host the 2022 tournament.

Explore further: Google to test cars without a driver

More information: www.dream-2022.jp/en/our_bid/bid_book/

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Sony signs 3-D video deal for 2010 World Cup

Dec 04, 2009

(AP) -- The 2010 World Cup is going 3-D. Sony Corp. said Friday it has signed a deal with FIFA, the international football governing body, to record up to 25 World Cup games in 3-D - a technology that gives ...

Sony to film World Cup games in 3D

Jun 08, 2010

The upcoming FIFA World Cup games will for the first time be filmed in 3D and broadcast in selected public viewing areas across the world, technology company Sony said on Tuesday.

Walkman outsells iPod in Japan: survey

Sep 03, 2009

The Walkman outsold the iPod in Japan last week for the first time in four years, handing Japanese electronics giant Sony a rare victory over arch-rival Apple, a survey showed.

High hopes for Sony's cut-throat plans

Sep 23, 2005

When Howard Stringer took over the helm of Japanese electronics giant Sony in June, many expected the Welsh national to be merciless in sacking people and closing down factories in an effort to boost profits.

Recommended for you

Google to test cars without a driver

2 hours ago

Google plans to begin testing its new prototype of a self-driving car - which, unlike earlier models, doesn't require a back-up driver - at NASA's Ames Research Center, just a few miles from the tech company's ...

Self-driving cars now need a permit in California

4 hours ago

Computer-driven cars have been testing their skills on California roads for more than four years—but until now, the state's Department of Motor Vehicles wasn't sure just how many were rolling around.

Index ranks Japan Asia's most efficient innovator (Update)

Sep 12, 2014

A new index ranks Japan as the most efficient among Asian countries in turning the building blocks of creativity into tangible innovations that benefit their economies and people while Myanmar, Pakistan and Cambodia are least ...

Making travel quick, safe for cars, bikes, walkers

Sep 10, 2014

Cellphones that warn drivers when people are crossing in front of them. Bicycles and cars that communicate with traffic lights. Sensors in cars that quickly alert other drivers to black ice, potholes or other ...

Tech giants bet on 'smart home' revolution

Sep 10, 2014

It's long been the stuff of science fiction, but tech giants hope the "smart home", where gadgets talk to each other and the fridge orders the milk, will soon become reality.

User comments : 0