GE to pay 500 mln dollars for New York river cleanup

Dec 23, 2010
A view of the New York City skyline from the Hudson River in 2009. General Electric said Thursday it will soon complete a 500-million-dollar toxic waste cleanup project in New York's Hudson river to settle a decades-old battle with US environmental authorities.

General Electric said Thursday it will soon complete a 500-million-dollar toxic waste cleanup project in New York's Hudson river to settle a decades-old battle with US environmental authorities.

The giant industrial conglomerate said it had informed the US (EPA) that it will complete the second and final phase of the Hudson riverbed dredging project in late Spring 2011.

It said it had set aside 500 million dollars for the project and that it "expects this step will resolve future uncertainty regarding Hudson dredging liabilities."

The battle goes back to the late 1970s, when US authorities banned a carcinogenic chemical -- polychlorinated biphenyls -- which was used extensively in a GE plant along the Hudson.

The chemical contaminated a 200-mile stretch of the river, but GE and the EPA argued over the extent of the cleanup and GE's responsibility.

"GE has consistently said it wanted to complete the dredging and now looks forward to doing so under terms that achieve the scientific objectives of dredging in a practical and cost-effective way," Ann Klee, vice president of GE's environmental programs, said in a statement.

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Caliban
not rated yet Dec 23, 2010
What a joke. The PCB contamination exists at several sites along the Hudson, and is not limited to just the riverbed, but also consists of several plumes of considerable extent that seeped into the local shale formation that underlies the sites where the PCBS were used and/or "disposed" of.

500 million USD is merely a drop in the bucket compared to what a full cleanup would cost, and in no way will bring about the return of the area to anything like a safe environment for human or animal life, which will be threatened oncoing by the continued presence of this poison in the area.