Experts keep close eye on badly injured whale

Dec 04, 2010
In this Dec. 1, 2010 photo provided by Cascadia Research, an injured whale is shown in South Puget Sound. (AP Photo/Cascadia Research, John Calambokidis) NO SALES

(AP) -- Experts are keeping a close eye on a badly injured whale seen swimming in south Puget Sound.

John Calambokidis (cal-um-BOH'-kee-dihs) of Olympia-based Cascadia Research says he has received a number of calls from people wondering whether euthanizing the whale might be the most humane option considering the severity of its injuries.

Calambokidis says that option is quite difficult legally, ethically, and logistically for several reasons. The whale might survive. Euthanizing a whale is difficult and could increase its suffering. And using the mass doses of chemicals it would take to kill the whale could potentially poison any wildlife or that scavenged the carcass.

Explore further: Research challenges understanding of biodiversity crisis

More information: Cascadia Research: http://www.cascadiaresearch.org/

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