China's online population rises to 450 million

Dec 30, 2010
A man plays online games at an internet cafe in Beijing
File photo of a man playing online games at an internet cafe in Beijing. China said Thursday the number of Internet users in what is already the world's largest online market had jumped to 450 million -- more than a third of the country's 1.3-billion-strong population.

China said Thursday the number of Internet users in what is already the world's largest online market had jumped to 450 million -- more than a third of the country's 1.3-billion-strong population.

"By the end of November, the number of netizens had reached 450 million, a rise of 20.3 percent compared to the same period last year," Wang Chen, minister for the press office of the State Council, China's cabinet, said.

The figure marks an increase of 30 million -- more than the population of Peru -- since the number of was last given in July.

"The coverage rate of the Internet in is 33.9 percent -- above the world average of 30 percent," Wang told a press conference.

"These figures show the environment for the development of the Internet in China is sound," he said.

China's spiralling online population has turned the Internet into a forum for citizens to express their opinions in a way rarely seen in a country where the traditional media is under strict government control.

The Internet has also become a lucrative marketplace. The value of online payments is expected to hit one trillion yuan (151 billion dollars) for the year, Beijing-based research company Analysys International said in a note.

The growing strength and influence of the has prompted concern in about the Internet's potential as a tool for generating social unrest, and authorities have stepped up surveillance in recent years.

The government blocks web content that it deems politically sensitive in a vast system dubbed the "Great Firewall of China".

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User comments : 25

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Glyndwr
5 / 5 (1) Dec 30, 2010
The truth is always politically sensitive ;)
geokstr
2 / 5 (4) Dec 30, 2010
The government blocks web content that it deems politically sensitive in a vast system dubbed the "Great Firewall of China".

The Chinese version of "net neutrality". Probably consulted with Kopp and Genachowski on how to do it right, when you're not encumbered by laws and constitutions and other meaningless rot like that.
Skeptic_Heretic
2.3 / 5 (3) Dec 30, 2010
The Chinese version of "net neutrality". Probably consulted with Kopp and Genachowski on how to do it right, when you're not encumbered by laws and constitutions and other meaningless rot like that.
Why must you act like this and say such ignorant and baseless things all the time?
kuntur2k
not rated yet Dec 30, 2010
Mind-blowing number. That number makes them the most computer literate country in the world. The US has only 300 mill people and most of them are not even online.
geokstr
1 / 5 (2) Dec 30, 2010
Why must you act like this and say such ignorant and baseless things all the time?

Amazing. No slimey homophobic sexual personal attacks this time.

It's called sarcasm. Get used to it. After taking heaps of Rule #5 from leftlings for 50 years, I'm just returning the favor. And so much of the "science" reporting here, like most of the popsci sites, is more "political science" than hard science.

I'm sure it's nothing more than coincidence that all that polisci slants to the left.
Modernmystic
1 / 5 (1) Dec 30, 2010
They've got something in China, not sure it qualifies as the internet though...
Skeptic_Heretic
5 / 5 (1) Dec 30, 2010
Amazing. No slimey homophobic sexual personal attacks this time.
I've never made one so I'm not sure where your assumption of that potential is comming from.
It's called sarcasm. Get used to it.
Doesn't look like sarcasm, just looks like you're an angry child who isn't going to get his way so you're using the nuclear option in conversation. Finger off the button please.

geokstr
1 / 5 (1) Dec 31, 2010
Amazing. No slimey homophobic sexual personal attacks this time.

I've never made one so I'm not sure where your assumption of that potential is comming from.

Oh, really? So you never left a reply to me, baselessly accusing me, not once, but twice, of "sucking corporate dicks"? If not, you have my apology, but I'm pretty certain it was you.
It's called sarcasm. Get used to it.

Doesn't look like sarcasm, just looks like you're an angry child who isn't going to get his way so you're using the nuclear option in conversation.

We'll see if "net neutrality" turns out to be this benign protector of individual rights you say it is or the left's backdoor attempt to impose a version of the Orwellian-named "Fairness Doctrine" on the internet. And I do think you will see quite a bit of opposition to it in the next Congress, you know, the one that "shellacked" The Won and his far left policies.
Skeptic_Heretic
5 / 5 (1) Dec 31, 2010
So you never left a reply to me, baselessly accusing me, not once, but twice, of "sucking corporate dicks"? If not, you have my apology, but I'm pretty certain it was you.
I think you're referring to Caliban, which is another poster who you accused me of being. Understandable mistake.
We'll see if "net neutrality" turns out to be this benign protector of individual rights you say it is or the left's backdoor attempt to impose a version of the Orwellian-named "Fairness Doctrine" on the internet.
You really like that "Orwellian Named" moniker. It's fitting if you turn out to be correct in the final outcome but I think you need to broaden your adjective base.
...the one that "shellacked" The Won and his far left policies.
The political scale has shifted drastically to the right over the past 3 decades. A lot of those policies that you call far left were proposed by conservatives, including Health care, almost exactly as it is in place now. TBC
Skeptic_Heretic
5 / 5 (1) Dec 31, 2010
I'm going to make an assumption here and don't take offense as none is intended. I'm assuming you're rather young when it comes to conservatives. I'm guessing mid to late twenties, maybe early thirties but probably not much past that. Dole Care was almost exactly what Obama care is today. The right pushed that harder than the left did this time around. Cap and Trade was proposed by Bush Sr almost exactly the same bill being passed around today. There were a lot more republicans back then, today not as many.

I think the party is driving ever further to the right, just be careful that you maintain your own ideologies and not those of a "grand leader" in the GOP.
ryggesogn2
2.3 / 5 (3) Dec 31, 2010
"Newspaper Boy Neutrality is not without downsides. If some time-insensitive publication (say, a monthly magazine), is placed in the queue just before a time-sensitive one (say, the early edition of a daily newspaper), neutrality demands that the time-insensitive publication be delivered first. The daily news producers are unable to pay extra for the on-time delivery that their customers want, and the monthlies are forced to buy a level of priority delivery that does not add value to their customers. At the margins, news creators are shut down, forced out by the market inefficiency created by the neutral protocols. The loss of their demand means a smaller market for the delivery companies (as well as reduced investment in new bikes). Innovation is stifled as companies serving those niches of the news market not well-matched to a neutral protocol — up-to-the-minute news and high-quality, time-insensitive news analysis — suffer under the system’s inflexibility."
tech.mit.edu
Skeptic_Heretic
1 / 5 (1) Dec 31, 2010
Marjon, that isn't an applicable comparison nor a realistic analogy. As the end user I'm not having items delivered to me. I'm actively retrieving them from the originator. A neutral protocol ensures that as the end user I can control the queue and determine what is most important to me. After all, the "free market" ideology demands and depends on freedom of choice, does it not?

In relevance to your analogy above, why don't they just hire another paperboy or innovate a better delivery solution? Regulation doesn't make the brain of business decay. If anything, it simply has to work smarter.
ryggesogn2
2.3 / 5 (3) Dec 31, 2010
"The FCC‘s proposed restriction on two-sided pricing for enhanced transport services isn‘t about correcting monopoly power in any event. It is simply industrial policy disguised as consumer protection. The FCC wants to protect content/application/service providers from having to pay for enhanced services that, given a choice, they would prefer not to pay for. The agency apparently believes that this protection is necessary in order to promote investment and innovation in content, though it concedes that this might also discourage investment and innovation in broadband service infrastructure. There is no substantial evidence that the former effect is more likely or more important than the latter. Unfortunately, evidence is not what fuels the Commission‘s engine on the net neutrality express."
Glen O. Robinson is Professor of Law Emeritus at the University of Virginia. He served as a Commissioner of the Federal Communications Commission from 1974-1976.
ryggesogn2
1 / 5 (1) Dec 31, 2010
Revolving Door : Search Results
Agency search: Federal Communications Commission

Number of records found: 148

www. opensecrets.org/revolving/search_result.php?agency=Federal+Communications+Commission&id=EIFCC
Skeptic_Heretic
not rated yet Dec 31, 2010
Number of records found: 148
That is out of every employee the FCC has had. That's a rather small number compared to the other regulatory bureaus.

Actually, I'm not sure I understand what that number is supposed to mean in regards to the page you've linked. I'm out of edit time so give me a bit to digest that piece.
Skeptic_Heretic
not rated yet Dec 31, 2010
Ok, so I figured out what you're trying to show me and I did a little screwing around with lobbiies I know of, like the various NASA lobbies. It only had 24, and I know there have been at least 40. Maybe NASA wasn't important to the site or maybe there's a flaw in their data. They only had 7 for the MMS and you can't deny that's wrong. They named more than 7 people on the news, the week after the oil spill.
ryggesogn2
2.3 / 5 (3) Dec 31, 2010
SH claimed former FCC commissioners, or any regulator, could not be influenced by the industries they regulate.
Obviously the data shows how political hacks get their ticket punched in some regulatory agency before settling into some well compensated position lobbying their former colleagues.
Thus it is easier for big businesses to control the regulators than their competition or customers. Which is why big businesses 'submit' to regulation.
Anyone read Tar Baby or has that been banned by the PC crowd?
Skeptic_Heretic
not rated yet Dec 31, 2010
SH claimed former FCC commissioners, or any regulator, could not be influenced by the industries they regulate.
Strawman, I did not say that. I said rather flatly that by the regulations on Federal Employees, they shouldn't be able to.
Anyone read Tar Baby
Name the author so we know which book you're referring to. That's not exactly an uncommon title.
geokstr
1 / 5 (1) Dec 31, 2010
The political scale has shifted drastically to the right over the past 3 decades.

You're dreaming.

Contrary to your belief, I am a VietNam veteran who has followed politics closely for the last 50 years. The political landscape has moved considerably left in that time, driven by Hollywood, the MSM, and the university professoriate.

People who created and led the SDS and other 1960s radical leftist groups are now in positions of power, and their views have not changed, only their methods. Many are Obama's friends and colleagues. Central government power and spending have exploded. Speech codes and political correctness loved by the left are pervasive everywhere.

One of the left's heroes, John Kennedy, would be a Republican in today's political climate. There are no Scoop Jacksons or other conservative Democrats left.

November was this center-right nation finally waking up to the rape of the country by the philosophy of the left. We're pissed off about it too.
Skeptic_Heretic
not rated yet Dec 31, 2010
You're dreaming.
No offense, but I wouldn't really be in the business of dreaming of you:)
November was this center-right nation finally waking up to the rape of the country by the philosophy of the left. We're pissed off about it too.
I'm going to disagree. This November was a wake up call to individual elected officials. If you look at Massachusetss, the Representatives stayed in place for the most part. I, and a few in the MSM think that the interrim election of Senator Brown was a blow off valve for the displeasure of the state. I'd say the country is more straight center than center right. That is a matter of opinion though, polls on the topic aren't exactly clear and unbiased.
geokstr
1 / 5 (1) Dec 31, 2010
I'd say the country is more straight center than center right. That is a matter of opinion though, polls on the topic aren't exactly clear and unbiased.

Yes, you made that claim before, and I proved you wrong with a Gallup poll, which I linked to back then. (I am having problems with links now though.)

They've taken the same exact poll for the last thirty years and it shows that nothing has changed in that time - 40% conservative to very conservative, 21% liberal to very liberal, the rest moderate.

There were no trick questions. They just asked people to pick their own labels.

I don't really see how you can interpret that as right down the middle. There are, and probably always have been, twice as many self-proclaimed conservatives as liberals, and the moderates would likely lean proportionately if pinned down.

But of course, Gallup must be biased, right?
Skeptic_Heretic
not rated yet Dec 31, 2010
Yes, you made that claim before, and I proved you wrong with a Gallup poll, which I linked to back then. (I am having problems with links now though.)
Yeah, apparently the science site doesn't like us actually citing our viewpoints. Just delete one of the leading slashes in the URL and it will post as text. Here's the gallup link you posted a while back. http:/www.cnsnews.com/node/52602
40% conservative to very conservative, 21% liberal to very liberal, the rest moderate.
The problem with those polls is that the terms conservative and liberal are very muddied and ill defined in the public conciousness. There are no clear delineations. When you look at the public polls on issues we're very much a center center country.
They just asked people to pick their own labels.
And that's where the problem comes in, you and I have different definitions of those terms. I'm willing to bet out of any 10 people you ask at random to define those terms you'd get 10 different answers.
maxcypher
Jan 01, 2011
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
geokstr
1 / 5 (1) Jan 01, 2011
They just asked people to pick their own labels.

And that's where the problem comes in, you and I have different definitions of those terms. I'm willing to bet out of any 10 people you ask at random to define those terms you'd get 10 different answers.

You just keep telling yourself that if it makes you feel better. I can see November 2012 from my house already.
zslewis91
not rated yet Jan 02, 2011
@geokstr & @SkepticHeretic american politics for the simple american mind...... what a waste of thought and time....prehaps if you two would have spent that time seriously studying mathematics, you wouldnt be on these forms 10 times a day haha. the both of you. old. and very out of touch. im happy to say i will live to see your generation die out, if only it could happen sooner...
geokstr
1 / 5 (1) Jan 02, 2011
old. and very out of touch. im happy to say i will live to see your generation die out, if only it could happen sooner..

Yes, I will not be around to see it, but within the next generation max, there will be a financial collapse that will make the Great Depression look like Happy Days Are Here Again. Europe is nearly there and we are not far behind. And it will come due to the politics you say you don't want to talk about.

You are either a leftist and/or someone too ignorant to see what's coming. Math may be the purist's hidey-hole, but it won't stop the inevitable.

Out of the ashes will grow one of two things, an all-controlling government much like that described in '1984", or one which redefines the relationship between governed and government, oriented towards personal responsibility and individual freedom.

I hope for your sake it's the latter, but I am not optimistic.

But now that I think about it, you must be a leftist, because you want us to die. Typical.

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