Chameleon model tries to explain the origin of dark energy

Dec 20, 2010 By Kurt Riesselmann
The CHASE results exclude nearly four orders of magnitude in chameleon mass.

Scientists at DOE's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory report new experimental constraints on a theoretical model that tries to explain the origin of dark energy, the mysterious force that accelerates the expansion of our universe.

According to the chameleon model, dark energy stems from particles that change their mass depending upon the local environment.

In the presence of ordinary matter, chameleons are massive particles that mediate a short-range force – too short to have appeared in searches for new forces. But in the vacuum of space, chameleons would have small masses. In principle, chameleons would interact with electromagnetic fields and, under certain conditions, could create photons, and photons could create chameleons.

Scientists of the Chameleon Afterglow Search (CHASE) explore this possibility by shining a laser beam into a vacuum chamber located inside a long, strong magnet. Traversing the magnetic field, the laser light might produce a population of chameleon particles within the chamber. When the laser is turned off, the chameleons would continue to interact with the magnetic field and produce an observable afterglow of photons.

No chameleon afterglow signal was seen in the CHASE data, which allowed the collaboration to place more stringent limits on chameleon models of . The new limits span a range of nearly four orders of magnitude in chameleon mass (see graphic) and are nearly five orders of magnitude more stringent than previous bounds from particle collider experiments.

The results are available in the arXiv preprint server and will soon appear in .

Explore further: With neutrons, scientists can now look for dark energy in the lab

Provided by Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

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User comments : 6

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lexington
not rated yet Dec 20, 2010
Wait, their hypothesis is particle that suddenly gain mass when they get close to normal matter?
El_Nose
not rated yet Dec 20, 2010
inertial dampers here we come
beelize54
1 / 5 (2) Dec 20, 2010
/*..no chameleon afterglow signal was seen in the CHASE data, which allowed the collaboration to place more stringent limits on chameleon models of dark energy...*/

This is how the experimental falsification is called in politically correct language of contemporary science. For another examples of this newspeak you can visit
http://chemistry....aper.htm
lexington
5 / 5 (3) Dec 20, 2010
This is how the experimental falsification is called in politically correct language of contemporary science.


Nothing more politically correct than reporting the facts. Come on these guys did an experiment and were perfectly happy to say "we didn't find anything".
Mr_Man
not rated yet Dec 21, 2010
So the Higgs Ocean (if it exists) has a lower energy level in an area of space where there is little or no matter to be found for great distances? Is this why gravity clumps matter together - because the Higgs Ocean has a stronger energy level when there is a lot of matter around?
tflahive
not rated yet Dec 21, 2010
If matter can be considered "condensed energy", then, it's possible that dark matter is some where between matter and energy. It might, for example "expand to fill the void (space)" or be easily "confined by magnetic fields".

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