Bone drug Zometa flops in breast cancer study

December 9, 2010 By MARILYNN MARCHIONE , AP Medical Writer

(AP) -- Doctors are reporting a stunning setback for a promising new approach for fighting breast cancer.

A large study found that the bone-building drug Zometa (zow-MAY-tuh) did not prevent the return of cancer or improve survival in women with early or mid-stage disease.

Zometa did seem to help women at least five years past or over 60. The drug's maker, Novartis AG, is considering further tests in those women. Studies also are testing similar drugs, bisphosphonates like Fosamax and Boniva, to see if they help prevent .

Zometa is currently used to treat cancer that has already spread to the bone. The new study will not change that or affect the use of other similar drugs for .

Explore further: Breast cancer study halted

0 shares

Related Stories

Breast cancer study halted

June 20, 2007

The U.S. National Cancer Institute halted a $100 million study of drugs designed to prevent breast cancer in women at risk for the disease.

FDA warns of fractures with osteoporosis drugs

October 13, 2010

(AP) -- Government health officials warned doctors and patients Wednesday about an increased risk of thigh fractures with a widely used group of bone-strengthening drugs.

Novel cancer drug has potential, study reports

November 12, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Monthly injections of the drug in breast cancer patients whose disease had spread to the bone helped reduce pain and prevent complications with less toxicity than current treatments.

Recommended for you

Machine Translates Thoughts into Speech in Real Time

December 21, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- By implanting an electrode into the brain of a person with locked-in syndrome, scientists have demonstrated how to wirelessly transmit neural signals to a speech synthesizer. The "thought-to-speech" process ...

Quantum Theory May Explain Wishful Thinking

April 14, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Humans don’t always make the most rational decisions. As studies have shown, even when logic and reasoning point in one direction, sometimes we chose the opposite route, motivated by personal bias or simply ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.