Apple, Steve Jobs hit new heights in 2010

Dec 26, 2010 by Veronique Dupont
Apple dethroned Microsoft as the world's most valuable technology company in 2010 as its co-founder Steve Jobs soared to new heights with the touchscreen iPad tablet computer and the latest iPhone.

Apple dethroned Microsoft as the world's most valuable technology company in 2010 as its co-founder Steve Jobs soared to new heights with the touchscreen iPad tablet computer and the latest iPhone.

Britain's Financial Times last week named Jobs its "Person of the Year" and even US President Barack Obama joined in the plaudits to the 55-year-old chief executive of the Cupertino, California-based gadget-maker.

Jobs' appearance on a San Francisco stage in January to unveil the iPad capped what the FT called "the most remarkable comeback in modern business history."

"It wasn't simply a matter of the illness that had sidelined him for half the year before, leaving him severely emaciated and eventually requiring a liver transplant," the newspaper said.

"Little more than a decade earlier, both Mr. Jobs' career and Apple, the company he had co-founded, were widely considered washed up, their relevance to the future of technology written off," it said.

Obama, at a White House news conference on Wednesday, held up Jobs as an example of the virtues of the "free market."

"We celebrate somebody like a , who has created two or three different revolutionary products," Obama said. "We expect that person to be rich, and that's a good thing."

Apple CEO Steve Jobs (R) looks at a display of the new MacBook Air at the company's headquarters in Cupertino, California. Britain's Financial Times last week named Jobs its "Person of the Year".

The iPad hit stores in the United States in April and Apple reported sales at the end of September of more than eight million of the devices that the FT said offer a glimpse into a world without a computer mouse or Windows.

Other technology firms are trying to match Apple's success with tablets of their own, including South Korea's Samsung, Canada's , maker of the Blackberry, and US computer giants Hewlett-Packard and Dell.

But none has yet to prove capable of preventing Apple from establishing the same dominance over the market that it exercises over the MP3 music player scene with the ubiquitous iPod, introduced in 2001.

Goldman Sachs said it expects Apple to ship 37.2 million iPads in 2011 -- "which could potentially make Apple one of the largest vendors in the global personal computing market" -- tablets plus personal computers.

The iPad wasn't Apple's only hit product in 2010.

The 4, the latest version of the touchscreen smartphone introduced by Apple in 2007, sold 14.1 million units in the quarter which ended in September, up 91 percent over the same quarter a year earlier.

Even Apple TV, a product Jobs once dismissed as a "hobby," is notching up strong sales. Apple said last week that sales of the latest model of the set-top box that can stream content from the Web had topped one million units.

The rare blemishes on Apple's record in 2010 were its continuing inability to come out with a promised white model of the iPhone 4 and complaints of lost reception due to the radical antenna design on the device.

Apple shares, worth 10 dollars at the end of 2003, gained around 60 percent this year, closing at more than 320 dollars on Wall Street on Thursday.

In May, surpassed Microsoft as the largest US technology company in terms of market value. The only companies with larger market capitalization than Apple's nearly 300 billion dollars are ExxonMobil and Petrochina.

Meeschaert New York analyst Gregori Volokhine described Apple's rise as "absolutely extraordinary" and said "every analyst has an even higher target price for next year, between 360 dollars and 430 dollars."

"Apple's more than just a company," Volokhine told AFP. "It's become a cultural phenomenon. The hard part now will be not to disappoint."

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Quantum_Conundrum
2 / 5 (3) Dec 26, 2010
Integration is what really makes this possible.

Ironically, the EU and US slap microsoft with a fine every time they tried to do some form in software integration in the past.

However, microsoft needs to adapt by really getting their hands into the hardware market directly, which they have made some attempts in the past several years, such as gaming consoles, etc. Problem is, governments don't want to allow microsoft to really do this, but they allow Apple to do it. Remember when the EU forced microsoft to remove their browser from the OS package, because it quashed competition, but here Apple could sell an integrated computer/phone/mp3/browser in one package with no fine.

Integration is one thing Apple has always done through selling the hardware and software as a single package, often as a "one-piece" unit. Microsoft is more or less, "let someone else make the computers, and we'll just make software." It isn't going to be possible for them to continue with that practice.
Quantum_Conundrum
1 / 5 (2) Dec 26, 2010
The governments were such hypocrits with this situation in that they made it "illegal" for microsoft to even make an OS and browser in one package, but it was "legal" for apple to make a "one gadget with one software package does everything" device.

I guess people realize "E-Readers" are already obsolete. Like I said on that other thread, they will shortly be relegated to nothing more than a "display add-on" for smart phones, for people with bad eyesight.

All in all, microsoft needs to diversify more into the hardware sector with fully integrated technologies, and the hypocrite governments need to back off now that all these companies are making smart phones and other integrated "do it all" devices.
Husky
4 / 5 (1) Dec 26, 2010
we can all critisize apple for having their software operate in their cozy walled flashfree garden and approved app store, but it hard to argue their strategy with that kind of sharevalue, as long as they keep coming with trendsetting concepts they can afford being exlusive , however als the trendfollowers make various Pads now must be open and compatible to make up for not having the apple logo
Nyloc
3 / 5 (5) Dec 26, 2010
Apple innovates and the rest of the market plays 'Copy Cat' in it's effort to catch up. Whereas its healthy that Apple receives competition, it's disappointing that they have to imitate Apple's products rather than innovate themselves.

By all means, build competitors to the iPad, but why build hardware that looks the same and use Google's operating system knock-off rather than build something better?

If you think its not possible to improve on Apple's products rather than just copy them, watch for Apple's next products. They provide their own competition!

Not only that, why not use Apple's business model and build products Apple doesn't? Smart vehicles? Smart homes? Robots? Life for everyone will be richer.
Quantum_Conundrum
2.3 / 5 (3) Dec 26, 2010
I wonder what other devices are going to be itegrated into the smart phones as technology converges through minaturization?

Already newer models have:

Phone
2 cameras
full color display w/ touch interface
gyroscope
accelerometer
gps
internet
gaming
USB
(insert "almost anything a laptop can do")

Is there anything else we can think of that would be useful to integrate into these devices?

Thermometer?
Barometer?
Humidity (think it's "cyclometer", but not sure.)

Just imagine how accurate weather forecasts could be if every smart phone became a data point for weather...Ok, you'd need to throw out data from phones that are indoors...
Quantum_Conundrum
1 / 5 (3) Dec 26, 2010
Not only that, why not use Apple's business model and build products Apple doesn't? Smart vehicles? Smart homes? Robots? Life for everyone will be richer.


Read above. "Anti-microsoft" laws. Governments arbitrarily forbade microsoft from really doing anything other than making operating systems and making word processor/database software, and even then, they fined them unless they split them into two seperate packages.

Oh yeah, people are actively working on "smart home" technology, its just things are more complicated than they first appear. The concept isn't new, the application is just difficult. Star Trek and the Jetsons first popularized the concept, but the actual doing of it takes integrated computer technologies that are only just now becoming affordable.

We are going to see nano-assembers are practical household "chore doer" robots over the next several decades as software, hardware, and networking technologies will make it possible.
Quantum_Conundrum
2 / 5 (4) Dec 26, 2010
With networking, especially wireless networking, you don't necessarily need to fit the entire "brain" and software for "rosie the robot" inside rosie's body. You can have Rosie's brain be a two-tiered application whereby some of the software runs on the robot itself, and some of it runs on a super-powerful 2020 era, 32 or 64 core processor PC. The "onboard" systems can do low-level things such as sensory input and navigation, while the "offboard" systems will perform higher order functions: intelligence, problem solving, parallel processing for speech communication with humans, etc.

The Body is just a remote-controlled dummy. Most of the Brain will be just one application on the PC. There will be no "robot revolution" because all you have to do is pull the cord.
Quantum_Conundrum
1 / 5 (3) Dec 26, 2010
As for smart homes, it takes a lot more money to go back and retro-fit a house with all of the latest computer technologies in every possible aspect you can think of, than it would to build it into the house to begin with. Then the problem is that it's going to be obsolete in 5 or 10 years anyway, which is counter-intuitive since when you buy or invest in a home or apartment you are hoping for a long term investment that is going to appreciate. It wouldn't be a great idea to install thousands and thousands of dollars worth of networking and other technologies, knowing they are goig to be outdated just a few years later.

Now in 10 or 15 years as things start to hit practical, physical limits, then it will make more sense for people to fully integrate their house into their home computer networks.
ryggesogn2
1 / 5 (3) Dec 26, 2010
Jobs donated to the democrats. Maybe that made the difference.
http://www.fec.go...ea.shtml
Bob_Kob
1 / 5 (1) Dec 26, 2010
Is there anything else we can think of that would be useful to integrate into these devices?

Thermometer?
Barometer?
Humidity (think it's "cyclometer", but not sure.)


HAHAHA
Quantum_Conundrum
1 / 5 (2) Dec 26, 2010
Bob_Kob:

Well, I thought of something else could be integrated into a smart phone. This really would be a step towards the medical tricorder.

You know those little monitors you can put on your finger to count pulse and blood oxygen levels? That shouldn't be too hard to fit into one of these gadgets. We should also be able to fit a digital blood glucose test kit for diabetics too. This would allow everyone, diabetic or not, to do blood tests so they can track their health. Alternatively, someone could develop an wrist-watch with a USB port that would network to a computer or smart phone to do these more specialized tasks.

Well, gee, I give away ideas and concepts for free, but it's not like I'm personally in any position to "capitalize" on it anyway, and besides someone else has probably thought of this stuff before anyway.
DamienS
5 / 5 (4) Dec 26, 2010
The governments were such hypocrits with this situation in that they made it illegal for MS to even make an OS and browser in one package, but it was legal for apple to make a "one gadget with one software package does everything" device.

No hypocrisy. MS chiefly sells OSes and business/office software. They were actively trying to monopolize access to the internet via their browser to the point of shoehorning it into the OS to make it harder to remove.

Apple basically sells appliances. They pick and/or design the hardware, including add-ons and make it operate within a walled environment of their making. They're not selling general purpose software. That's the chief difference.

microsoft needs to diversify more into the hardware sector with fully integrated technologies

That would be a mistake. Design and hardware isn't their core competency, in fact, they suck at it. They're a software company and should remain so. But they also need to be better at that too...
finitesolutions
not rated yet Dec 27, 2010
Hard work and desire to succeed pays off. All is possible because our great leader Steve Jobs ( jobs?!?!? hummmmm). If everybody buys an Apple product unemployment will be solved ( hummmmm ). Long live without crash Apple products.
.......................................
Hardware design is done using software tools so naturally Microsoft or any software company should be good at it.
eMJayy
5 / 5 (1) Dec 27, 2010
37 million iPads in 2011? Yeah, right. Apple's not going to be able to dominate the tablet market in the same way that it did the portable MP3 player market. The MP3 player market was actually a niche market which didn't even extend globally, so there wasn't a whole lot of room left once Apple captured it with the iTunes - iPod combo. Tablets (other than Apple's iPad) aren't going to be expensive for much longer, and this will allow them to compete with PCs in both developed and emerging markets. Apple will make lots of money from their iPad, but the iPad is destined to become the most expensive alternative in a market filled with feature-rich, flexible, affordable alternatives based on a far more ubiquitous OS ecosystem than iOS.
DamienS
3.7 / 5 (3) Dec 27, 2010
What's funny is that even with a flawed product like iPhone 4, people still lap it up. And iTunes running on the PC platform is the worst piece of crap software I've ever come across. I say this honestly as a PC using iPhone 3G user who would love to upgrade to iPhone 4 but won't until they fix the antenna issue (probably not until V5).
Skeptic_Heretic
5 / 5 (2) Dec 27, 2010
What's funny is that even with a flawed product like iPhone 4, people still lap it up. And iTunes running on the PC platform is the worst piece of crap software I've ever come across.
There was a study done on this aspect of consumerism and the researchers found that you can crank out crap devices all day long, but if your consumers agree with your ideals and vision, they'll continue to support your company until they're unable to do so.

The whole early adopter mentality plays into it as well.
Rawley
not rated yet Dec 27, 2010
Quantum_Conundrum: ThinkGeek has a wristwatch that is linked to a phone via bluetooth that allows you to see who is calling and ignore them without getting your phone out. It wouldn't be much of a stretch to include your heartrate monitor and extras into something like that.

DamienS: Yea I refuse to install itunes or use an apple product because of itunes. my android phone lets me just copy music and other files directly to the phone's sd card. There are people out there that don't have an idea how to do that though; but I'm guessing those people aren't worried about how itunes runs. and those stupid background services that it tries to run suck up computer resources.
vincentvictor
not rated yet Dec 27, 2010
The past decade has been a remarkably successful decade for Apple and it has already overtook Microsoft, to become world’s largest technology.
Skeptic_Heretic
not rated yet Dec 28, 2010
ThinkGeek has a wristwatch that is linked to a phone via bluetooth that allows you to see who is calling and ignore them without getting your phone out. It wouldn't be much of a stretch to include your heartrate monitor and extras into something like that.

What an awesome idea.
panorama
not rated yet Dec 31, 2010
Appleism is slowly becoming a new religion. I got a christmas card from a friend of mine who some would call an "Apple Fanboy". On the back of the card it said, "In Apple We Trust".

I could careless if people get that big of a hard on from a certain company's products, but do you really want a messiah that wears black mock turtle neck shirts and stone wash jeans? C'mon Jobs, you've changed the world of technology...you could at least upgrade the wardrobe.
sherriffwoody
not rated yet Jan 01, 2011
even with the disatrious iPhone4 release with all its errors and an tablet that is on the verge of being surpassed in sales, still apple can't do no wrong, media is so biased to apple
Mesafina
not rated yet Jan 02, 2011
@nyloc I would not consider the Android OS to be imitating the iphone OS any more then I consider one oil company to be imitating another by drilling for oil. It's only sensible someone would copy the good things about a product and discard the bad. Preventing people from copying the good (aka patent and copyright protection as we understand it in the west) is in fact anti-capitalist and hinders competition by allowing government enforceable monopolies. The consumer benefit from copycats, as some copy AND improve.

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