Swede broadcasts music from his stomach

Nov 26, 2010

A Swedish man broadcast music from his stomach for several hours via a mini audio system, but said he was disappointed by the sound quality.

The sound was "bad, bad. It was a very bad sound. But that was not the important thing, I just wanted to show that it worked," said Fredrik Hjelmqvist, 45, owner of a hi-fi equipment shop in Stockholm.

"It was a success, we were the first in the world to do this," said Hjelmqvist, who hopes to sell his invention for around 12,800 euros (17,000 dollars).

The plastic capsule containing the device is about three centimetres long (1.2 inches) and 1.5 centimetres (0.6 inches) in diameter and contains a miniature battery-powered audio device.

The was heard by using a connected to an .

After about three hours, however, the muted strains of Gloria Gaynor's "I Will Survive" and the Village People's "YMCA" faded and could no longer be heard.

"The operation shouldn't in any case last beyond this weekend, for natural reasons," Hjelmqvist added.

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sstritt
not rated yet Nov 27, 2010
future ig nobel prize winner
yyz
not rated yet Nov 27, 2010
"After about three hours, however, the muted strains of Gloria Gaynor's "I Will Survive" and the Village People's "YMCA" faded and could no longer be heard"

Three hours of Gloria Gaynor and the Village People? How could he keep it down that long? :^P
jjoensuu
not rated yet Nov 28, 2010
12,800 euros for sending sounds from ones stomach? Sounds a bit steep...