Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource 2010 - 2011 run starts this week

Nov 18, 2010 By Lori Ann White
SSRL's SPEAR3 storage ring. (Photo by Brad Plummer.)

The 2010–2011 user run starts this week at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. The run is scheduled to last until July 25, 2011, with an estimated 1500 users coming to SLAC over the course of the run to perform research using SSRL's X-ray beamlines. The synchrotron will begin the run at an operating current of 350 milliamperes, up from 200 mA during the 2009–2010 run. The team plans to ramp up to the SPEAR3 top design current of 500 mA sometime during the run.

The higher operating current is possible in part thanks to upgrades made to the SPEAR3 injector systems ("SPEAR3 Injector Beefed Up for Frequent Injection Regimen" below) during the annual three-month shutdown. The upgrades improved injector reliability and reproducibility, which means the system is ready to handle the more frequent injections of electrons into the storage ring required to maintain a higher operating current.

In addition to projects that increased injector reliability, a major reorganization of the SPEAR accelerator and beamline computer networks is currently under way ("SPEAR3 Reorganization Under Way" below), with much of the work now completed for the accelerator and migration of the beamlines to their new sub-networks to take place incrementally during the run.

Seismic upgrades round out the major projects either completed or pushed forward during the past shutdown.

SSRL is ready for the user run, inside and out.

SPEAR3 Injector Beefed Up for Frequent Injection Regimen

Work at the SPEAR3 storage ring during the annual downtime involved projects both large and small to support the continued use of frequent-injection mode. Frequent injection is necessary to support SPEAR3's goal of reaching its full design current of 500 milliamperes—and improved data collection for researchers using the Stanford Lightsource's bright X-rays. But frequent injection has challenges of its own.

SPEAR3 Computer Network Reorganization Under Way

A multi-year project to reorganize the computer network for the SPEAR3 accelerator and beamlines is bearing fruit, according to Clemens Wermelskirchen, manager of the SPEAR3 control system and network, and his counterpart for the SPEAR3 beamlines, Martin George. The goal is to improve network performance and reliability—as vital to the performance of the accelerator and beamlines as mechanical upgrades and maintenance, Wermelskirchen said.

"The SPEAR3 control system can never go down," he stated. "If we lose a significant network component, we lose the accelerator." However, the previous organization of the network coupled with the growth of SSRL made the network increasingly difficult to support.

Explore further: Novel approach to magnetic measurements atom-by-atom

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

SPEAR3 Accelerator Approved for 500mA

Jun 02, 2006

This spring the Department of Energy gave SPEAR3 license to run the accelerator at 500 milliamperes (mA), the current the accelerator was designed to use. Since it opened in January 2004, the machine has operated ...

Automated beamline messages give SSRL users a break

Sep 30, 2010

Some users of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource enjoyed a little extra peace of mind, as well as more regular meals and sleep, starting in early spring of 2010. That's when Sam Webb gave them ...

Beamline 12 to Unlock Secrets of Organic Molecules

Aug 30, 2006

Starting this fall, scientists will have a new tool for peering into the materials that make up living systems at the Molecular Observatory for Structural Molecular Biology at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation ...

Low-Alpha Mode Increases Possibilities at SSRL

Sep 20, 2007

Since the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) began experiments in 1973, it has proven to be a bottomless well of scientific discovery. Now, a team of SLAC accelerator physicists is working to ...

First Research Projects Underway at Diamond

Feb 06, 2007

This week marks the dawn of a new era of scientific endeavour as Diamond Light Source, the UK’s brand new synchrotron facility, opens its doors for business and welcomes its very first scientific users.

Recommended for you

Novel approach to magnetic measurements atom-by-atom

1 hour ago

Having the possibility to measure magnetic properties of materials at atomic precision is one of the important goals of today's experimental physics. Such measurement technique would give engineers and physicists an ultimate ...

Scientists demonstrate Stokes drift principle

4 hours ago

In nature, waves – such as those in the ocean – begin as local oscillations in the water that spread out, ripple fashion, from their point of origin. But fans of Star Trek will recall a different sort of wave pattern: ...

User comments : 0