Soy isoflavones may modify risk of breast cancer

Nov 08, 2010

Increased phytoestrogens commonly found in dietary soy may modify the risk of some types of breast cancer, according to findings presented at the Ninth Annual AACR Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research Conference, held Nov. 7-10, 2010.

"This study was unique in that we looked at specific subtypes of breast cancer, and found a suggestion that menopausal status may play a role in risk," said Anne Weaver, a graduate student at the University at Buffalo and research apprentice at Roswell Park Cancer Institute.

Weaver and colleagues evaluated 683 women with breast cancer and compared them with 611 healthy women. Dietary data patterns were observed using a food frequency questionnaire and isoflavones were measured as a dietary, rather than supplemental, intake. Isoflavone intake was divided into three groups.

Those women with the highest isoflavone intake had an approximately 30 percent decreased risk of having an invasive , and an approximately 60 percent decreased risk of having a grade 1 tumor.

Observations by menopausal status revealed the following: Among premenopausal women, the highest intake of isoflavones had a 30 percent decreased risk of stage I disease, a 70 percent decreased risk of having a tumor larger than 2 cm, and a 60 percent decreased risk of having stage 2 . These connections were not seen among .

Like most dietary studies, Weaver said these findings are not definitive and need to be considered in the context of further follow-up and confirmation.

"Still, we definitely saw a reduction that deserves further investigation," she said.

Explore further: Leukemia drug shows promise for skin, breast and other cancers

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Green tea and mushrooms cut breast cancer risk: study

Mar 18, 2009

Chinese women who ate mushrooms and drank green tea significantly cut their risk of breast cancer and the severity of the cancer in those who did develop it, an Australian researcher said Wednesday.

Recommended for you

Understanding your kidney tumor in 3D

31 minutes ago

Most patients rely on their doctors to decipher the black, white and gray images on their CT scans. But what if a patient could instead hold a 3D model made from the CT image in his hands? Suddenly, the picture ...

Biomarker in aggressive breast cancer identified

14 hours ago

Two Northwestern University scientists have identified a biomarker strongly associated with basal-like breast cancer, a highly aggressive carcinoma that is resistant to many types of chemotherapy. The biomarker, ...

MRI better detects recurrent breast cancer

15 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Single-screening breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detects 18.1 additional cancers after negative findings with mammography and ultrasonography (US) per 1,000 women with a history of breast ...

Natural (born) killer cells battle pediatric leukemia

Aug 19, 2014

Researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have shown that a select team of immune-system cells from patients with leukemia can be multiplied in the lab, creating an army of natural killer cells that ...

User comments : 0