Scientists redefine how our immune system responds to viruses

Nov 02, 2010
Virus attaches to outer cell membrane with antibodies still attached

(PhysOrg.com) -- Landmark research from the Medical Research Council (MRC) has discovered that antibodies can fight viruses from within infected cells. This finding transforms the previous scientific understanding of our immunity to viral diseases like the common cold, 'winter vomiting' and gastroenteritis. It also gives scientists a different set of rules that pave the way to the next generation of antiviral drugs.

Viruses are mankind's biggest killer, responsible for twice as many deaths each year as cancer, yet they are among the hardest of all diseases to treat. Previously scientists believed that antibodies could only reduce infection by attacking viruses outside cells and also by blocking their entry into cells.

Scientists at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge have now shown that antibodies remain attached when viruses enter healthy cells. Once inside, the antibodies trigger a response, led by a protein called TRIM21, which pulls the into a disposal system used by the cell to get rid of unwanted material. This process happens quickly, usually before most viruses have chance to harm the cell. The MRC scientists have further shown that increasing the amount of TRIM21 in cells makes this process even more effective, suggesting new ways of making better antiviral drugs.

Dr Leo James from the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology (LMB) and lead author of the study, said: “Doctors have plenty of antibiotics to fight bacterial infections but few antiviral drugs. Although these are early days, and we don’t yet know whether all viruses are cleared by this mechanism, we are excited that our discoveries may open multiple avenues for developing new .”

“Antibodies are formidable molecular war machines; it now appears that they can continue to attack viruses within cells. This research is not only a leap in our understanding of how and where antibodies work, but more generally in our understanding of immunity and infection,” says Sir Greg Winter, deputy director of the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology.

Dr James' team is working with MRC Technology to bring this exciting finding from laboratory bench to doctor's cabinet as quickly as possible. This is basic research in cells. The next stage is to progress this finding through to clinical trials.

The paper: mediate intracellular immunity through tripartite motif-containing 21 (TRIM21), is published online by Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences today.

Explore further: Infant cooing, babbling linked to hearing ability

More information: Leo C. James et al., Antibodies Q:1 mediate intracellular ; 2 immunity through tripartite motif-containing 21 (TRIM21), PNAS www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1014074107

Provided by Medical Research Council

4.8 /5 (8 votes)

Related Stories

People also have antiviral 'plant defences'

Sep 27, 2010

In addition to known antiviral agents such as antibodies and interferons, people also seem to have a similar immune system to that previously identified in plants. This is the result of research carried out by Esther Schnettler ...

Map of herpes virus protein suggests a new drug therapy

Jul 06, 2010

The mechanism by which a herpes virus invades cells has remained a mystery to scientists seeking to thwart this family of viruses. New research funded by the National Institutes of Health and published online ...

Recommended for you

Infant cooing, babbling linked to hearing ability

7 hours ago

Infants' vocalizations throughout the first year follow a set of predictable steps from crying and cooing to forming syllables and first words. However, previous research had not addressed how the amount ...

Developing 'tissue chip' to screen neurological toxins

8 hours ago

A multidisciplinary team at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Morgridge Institute for Research is creating a faster, more affordable way to screen for neural toxins, helping flag chemicals that ...

Gene mutation discovered in blood disorder

12 hours ago

An international team of scientists has identified a gene mutation that causes aplastic anemia, a serious blood disorder in which the bone marrow fails to produce normal amounts of blood cells. Studying a family in which ...

Airway muscle-on-a-chip mimics asthma

14 hours ago

The majority of drugs used to treat asthma today are the same ones that were used 50 years ago. New drugs are urgently needed to treat this chronic respiratory disease, which causes nearly 25 million people ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

genastropsychicallst
1 / 5 (1) Nov 02, 2010
Re ?