First peer-reviewed study finds BPA levels in US foods 1,000 times less than limits

Nov 02, 2010

For the first time in the United States, researchers are reporting in a peer-reviewed scientific journal today detection of Bisphenol A (BPA) in fresh and canned food as well as food wrapped in plastic packaging.

The amounts in the limited sample, however, were almost 1,000 times lower than the "tolerable daily intake" levels set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). Their report appears online in the American Chemical Society journal, Environmental Science & Technology.

Arnold J. Schecter and colleagues note that BPA is used in lining metal cans and in polycarbonate plastics such as baby bottles, although some manufacturers are switching to BPA-free products. "In humans, BPA is associated with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and male sexual dysfunction in exposed workers," they state. "Food is a major exposure source. We know of no studies reporting BPA in U.S. fresh food, canned food, and food in plastic packaging in peer reviewed journals."

To fill that gap in scientific knowledge, the scientists measured BPA levels in 105 human, cat, and dog foods. They detected BPA in 63 of 105 human food samples from grocery stores in Dallas, and present a detailed list of foods, brands, and BPA levels in the text of the study. The levels were lower than the 50 micrograms per kilogram of body weight standard used by EPA and EFSA and comparable to levels detected in the past. Schecter noted that some studies have shown adverse effects associated with exposure to BPA at lower doses. "Further research is indicated to determine levels in U.S. in larger, representative sampling," the report said.

Explore further: Oil-swishing craze: Snake oil or all-purpose remedy?

More information: ACS' Environmental Science and Technology: "Bisphenol A (BPA) in U.S. Food"

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User comments : 2

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electrichead
5 / 5 (1) Nov 02, 2010
This isn't very informative. The quote "We know of no studies reporting BPA in U.S. fresh food, canned food, and food in plastic packaging in peer reviewed journals" is ridiculous. There are a lot of studies. Also, even if a single item has low levels, nobody is only exposed to one of these sources per day. They are exposed to many, and it all adds up.
sams
not rated yet Nov 02, 2010
Most of the controversy with BPA is over what the safe levels are, so this article is not much use. It is worth also reading some background on the people that produced the report: http://en.wikiped..._Society

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