NASA finds 4th crack on space shuttle fuel tank

Nov 15, 2010 By MARCIA DUNN , AP Aerospace Writer
In this picture made available by NASA, a technician examines the area of the space shuttle Discovery's external tank where foam was removed to study the source a cracks on the tank in Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Wednesday, Nov. 10, 2010. (AP Photo/NASA, Troy Cryder)

(AP) -- NASA has found a fourth crack in the fuel tank for space shuttle Discovery.

Discovery's final mission remains on hold as engineers and technicians work to fix all the cracks as well as a hydrogen gas leak.

spokesman Allard Beutel said Monday the repairs need to be made before a new launch date is picked. The launch window opens Nov. 30 and closes Dec. 6.

NASA first discovered a long crack in the insulating foam of the , after the countdown was halted Nov. 5 by the gas leak. Last week, two cracks were found on the exterior of the tankf. Then another crack popped up, then another.

The cracks are in the tank's central, ribbed section, which holds instruments, not fuel.

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More information: NASA: http://www.nasa.gov

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axemaster
1 / 5 (1) Nov 16, 2010
Why don't they use duct tape? Duct tape can do anything.
LordOfRuin
1 / 5 (1) Nov 16, 2010
Ha ha ha, duct tape it!

If it moves and it shouldn't, duct tape it.
If it doesn't move and it should, WD40 it.
krundoloss
1 / 5 (1) Nov 16, 2010
Why is it that we have Thousands of aircraft buzzing around the earth, all sealed properly, but we cant seal up one dam shuttle that we use so rarely. They need some 1960's funding at NASA. Then they could afford the duct tape . . . .
JamesThomas
1 / 5 (1) Nov 16, 2010
One would think that NASA would have a high-tech-duct-tape that could withstand the stresses of a launch. Then there is always J.B. Weld.