NASA finds 4th crack on space shuttle fuel tank

November 15, 2010 By MARCIA DUNN , AP Aerospace Writer
In this picture made available by NASA, a technician examines the area of the space shuttle Discovery's external tank where foam was removed to study the source a cracks on the tank in Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Wednesday, Nov. 10, 2010. (AP Photo/NASA, Troy Cryder)

(AP) -- NASA has found a fourth crack in the fuel tank for space shuttle Discovery.

Discovery's final mission remains on hold as engineers and technicians work to fix all the cracks as well as a hydrogen gas leak.

spokesman Allard Beutel said Monday the repairs need to be made before a new launch date is picked. The launch window opens Nov. 30 and closes Dec. 6.

NASA first discovered a long crack in the insulating foam of the , after the countdown was halted Nov. 5 by the gas leak. Last week, two cracks were found on the exterior of the tankf. Then another crack popped up, then another.

The cracks are in the tank's central, ribbed section, which holds instruments, not fuel.

Explore further: Cracks found in shuttle fuel tank, not just foam (Update)

More information: NASA: http://www.nasa.gov

0 shares

Related Stories

NASA shooting for Sunday shuttle Discovery launch

March 12, 2009

(AP) -- NASA is replacing some space shuttle connections in hopes of plugging a gas leak and launching Discovery to the international space station on Sunday, after delays of more than a month.

NASA: progress studying shuttle tank foam

October 17, 2005

NASA engineers say they are closer to resolving the problem of large chunks of foam insulation falling off space shuttle external fuel tanks during launch.

Recommended for you

Bethlehem star may not be a star after all

December 2, 2016

It is the nature of astronomers and astrophysicists to look up at the stars with wonder, searching for answers to the still-unsolved mysteries of the universe. The Star of Bethlehem, and its origin, has been one of those ...

Could there be life in Pluto's ocean?

December 1, 2016

Pluto is thought to possess a subsurface ocean, which is not so much a sign of water as it is a tremendous clue that other dwarf planets in deep space also may contain similarly exotic oceans, naturally leading to the question ...

Tangled threads weave through cosmic oddity

December 1, 2016

New observations from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have revealed the intricate structure of the galaxy NGC 4696 in greater detail than ever before. The elliptical galaxy is a beautiful cosmic oddity with a bright core ...

Embryonic cluster galaxy immersed in giant cloud of cold gas

December 1, 2016

Astronomers studying a cluster of still-forming protogalaxies seen as they were more than 10 billion years ago have found that a giant galaxy in the center of the cluster is forming from a surprisingly-dense soup of molecular ...

4 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

axemaster
1 / 5 (1) Nov 16, 2010
Why don't they use duct tape? Duct tape can do anything.
LordOfRuin
1 / 5 (1) Nov 16, 2010
Ha ha ha, duct tape it!

If it moves and it shouldn't, duct tape it.
If it doesn't move and it should, WD40 it.
krundoloss
1 / 5 (1) Nov 16, 2010
Why is it that we have Thousands of aircraft buzzing around the earth, all sealed properly, but we cant seal up one dam shuttle that we use so rarely. They need some 1960's funding at NASA. Then they could afford the duct tape . . . .
JamesThomas
1 / 5 (1) Nov 16, 2010
One would think that NASA would have a high-tech-duct-tape that could withstand the stresses of a launch. Then there is always J.B. Weld.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.