New record achieved with Konarka's Power Plastic photovoltaic material with 8.3% efficiency certification

Nov 30, 2010 by Candace Ganger
New world-record achieved with Konarka's Power Plastcis with 8.3% efficiency certification

National Energy Renewable Laboratory (NERL) has announced Konarka Technologies' organic-based photovoltaic (OPV) solar cells have demonstrated the highest performance for an organic photovoltaic cell at a record-breaking efficiency of 8.3%. This unprecedented certification is up from previously produced cells at 6% just two short years ago.

Using a roll-to-roll manifacturing process, Konarka, headquartered in Lowell, Massachusettes, produces flexible solar cells -- Konarka Power Plastic -- which is a thin film of plastic that converts light to energy. They're more affordable than other solar cell technologies because of the material, though continue to seek a viable market.


A co-founder of Konarka says the unsurpassed NREL certification opens new doors for large scale applications.

The company insists the material can be used in a variety of other applications such as tents and shade structures, a carport system, or building integrated photovoltaic systems. Because of the lightweight, flexible material, OPV solar cells may be used where traditional photovoltaic systems may not be as effective.

Explore further: Ambitious EU targets for renewable energies make economic sense

More information: Konarka press release: www.konarka.com/index.php/site… ncy_certification_fr

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Ratfish
not rated yet Nov 30, 2010
Seems like this just brings it in line with the efficiency of production models of TFPVs. Is this a prototype or a production model? How much cheaper is it?