Imaging with neutrons: Magnetic domains shown for the first time in 3-D

Nov 23, 2010
Boundaries of magnetic domains can be computer imaged in three dimensions. Credit: HZB/Manke, Grothausmann

Although they exist in almost every magnetic material, you cannot see them: magnetic domains are microscopically small regions of uniform magnetization. Dr. Ingo Manke and his group at the Institute of Applied Material Research at HZB, Germany, have developed a method by which they can image the full spatial structure of magnetic domains -- even deep within materials.

Every is divided into such magnetic domains. Scientists call them "Weiss domains" after physicist Pierre-Ernest Weiss, who predicted their existence theoretically more than a hundred years ago. In 1907, he recognized that the magnetic moments of within a bounded domain are equally aligned.

All pursuit of this theory has so far been limited to two-dimensional images and material surfaces. Accordingly, researchers have only ever been able to see a domain in cross section. Together with colleagues from the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing and the Swiss Paul-Scherrer-Institute, Dr. Ingo Manke and his group at the Institute of Applied Material Research at HZB have developed a method by which they can image the full spatial structure of magnetic domains – even deep within materials. To do this, special iron-silicon crystals were produced at the Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, for which the research group of Rudolf Schäfer had already developed model representations. Their actual existence has now been proven for the first time. With it, the researchers have solved a decade-old problem in imaging. Their findings will be published in Nature Communications.

Most magnetic materials consist of a complex network of magnetic domains. The researchers' newly developed method exploits the areas where the domains meet – the so-called domain walls. Within a domain, all magnetic moments are the same, but the magnetic alignment is different from one domain to another. So, at each domain wall, the direction of the magnetic field changes. The researchers exploit these changes for their radiographic method in which they use not light, but neutrons.

Magnetic fields deflect the neutrons slightly from their flight path, just as water diverts light. An object under water cannot be directly perceived because of this phenomenon; the object appears distorted and in a different location. Similarly, the neutrons pass through domain walls along their path through the magnetic material. At these walls, they are diverted into different directions.

This diversion, however, is only a very weak effect. It is typically invisible in a neutron radiogram, since it is overshadowed by non-diverted rays. The researchers therefore employ several diffraction gratings in order to separate the diverted rays. During a measurement, they rotate the sample and shoot rays through it from all directions. From the separated rays, they can calculate all domain shapes and generate an image of the domain network in its entirety.

Magnetic domains are important for understanding material properties and the natural laws of physics. They also play an important role in everyday life: most notably in storage media such as hard disks, for example, or battery chargers for laptops or electric vehicles. If the domain properties are carefully chosen to minimize electricity loss at the , the storage medium becomes more efficient.

Explore further: Researchers demonstrate ultra low-field nuclear magnetic resonance using Earth's magnetic field

More information: DOI:10.1038/ncomms1125

Related Stories

World's tiniest mirror

Aug 10, 2010

Just as the path of photons of light can be directed by a mirror, atoms possessing a magnetic moment can be controlled using a magnetic mirror. Research reported in the Journal of Applied Physics investigates the feasibility of usi ...

Walls falling faster for solid-state memory

Jun 09, 2010

After running a series of complex computer simulations, researchers have found that flaws in the structure of magnetic nanoscale wires play an important role in determining the operating speed of novel devices using such ...

Novel magnets made from the strongest known hydrogen bond

Dec 06, 2006

A team of scientists from the US, the UK and Germany has been the first to make a magnetic material constructed from nature's strongest known hydrogen bond. Hydrogen bonds are responsible for many of the properties ...

Recommended for you

User comments : 4

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Loodt
1 / 5 (3) Nov 23, 2010
According to topology only four colours are required to differentiate between the countries of the world on an atlas. Surely the same principle would apply to these magnetic domains. Why did the researchers use more than four colours?

A Legend would have helped!
retrosurf
5 / 5 (3) Nov 23, 2010
The "four color problem" is for flat maps. Three
dimensional maps can require an arbitrary number of
colors.

Additionally, one could use color to indicate
temperature. The shading in this problem could indicate
another variable, such as temperature (which is always
an interesting thing to see when talking about
magnetic domains).
Loodt
1 / 5 (3) Nov 23, 2010
retrosurf, the 4 colour rule applies to ball maps, or globes, as well.

A legend would have helped to stop the speculation.
mattytheory
not rated yet Nov 23, 2010
Loodt, a ball map or globe is still a 2d map overlayed onto a 3d surface - there is length and width but no depth.

But I do agree, a legend would have been nice.