'Fourth generation' Internet arrives in Hong Kong

Nov 26, 2010
The latest generation of wireless Internet that will allow people to watch a crystal clear movie or live sporting event on the street or atop a hill is being deployed throughout Hong Kong. The Long Term Evolution (LTE) network will give super high speeds across the city and could mean the end of computers ever needing to be plugged into a wall for a connection to the net.

The latest generation of wireless Internet that will allow people to watch a crystal clear movie or live sporting event on the street or atop a hill is being deployed throughout Hong Kong.

The Long Term Evolution (LTE) network will give super high speeds across the city and could mean the end of computers ever needing to be plugged into a wall for a connection to the net.

The so-called "fourth generation" system is being rolled out by Hong Kong mobile network operator CSL in partnership with telecoms equipment maker ZTE Corporation.

"The first launch of an LTE network any place in Asia is truly historic," Joseph O'Konek, CSL's chief executive, told AFP.

"For a lot of people, this will be their first experience of the Internet. They are at a huge advantage to previous Internet generations because they are leapfrogging all those fixed line technologies.

"It is truly going to unleash the power of human networks as this kind of system rolls out more and more across the world."

LTE enables faster data downloads and uploads on compared with a third-generation network.

The system will give speeds of up to 100 megabits per second (Mbps) and should make the high quality viewing of full length movies or realtime live sporting events possible anywhere in the city.

LTE networks are already operating in Europe, Scandinavia and North America. Japan will have an LTE system before the end of the year and huge growth in LTE connections is expected over the next five years, especially in China.

Meanwhile CSL's owner, the Australian telecoms giant Telstra, said it is looking to make acquisitions to strengthen its position in the Asia-Pacific region.

"Organic growth is always the best growth. But you do need to acquire new technology that's going to allow you to fuel the growth in the future," David Thodey, the company's CEO, told the Wall Street Journal.

"Sometimes you expand geographically... or sometimes you want to expand your market share. We will be doing all three because it's critically important for a company to keep pushing the limits as you go forward."

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User comments : 6

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Bob_Kob
2.8 / 5 (4) Nov 26, 2010
Haha, telstra realises its monopoly is coming to an end due to the NBN fibre optic network being built in australia and has decided to piss off to other countries. Good riddance.
lengould100
2 / 5 (2) Nov 26, 2010
There's a lot of hype hidden in here somewhere. 100 Mbps via radio transmission to each of a telecom's customers simultaneously? Or 100 Mbps shared among all of them? Or 100 Mbps shared among all the subscriberes using a single cell tower's active users?

Every household in Hong Cong would like to know when they can cancel their cable subscriptions.
dtxx
3 / 5 (2) Nov 26, 2010
It's still going to suck for latency intesive applications. Don't expect the wall jack to go away just yet.

I had an IT consulting gig at one point with a multinational based in australia (i'm in u.s.). I too feel your hatred for Telstra aka Bigpond. They should go jump in a big pond. Of hydrochloric acid.
that_guy
1 / 5 (1) Nov 26, 2010
There's a lot of hype hidden in here somewhere. 100 Mbps via radio transmission to each of a telecom's customers simultaneously? Or 100 Mbps shared among all of them? Or 100 Mbps shared among all the subscriberes using a single cell tower's active users?

Every household in Hong Cong would like to know when they can cancel their cable subscriptions.


Better to be thought a fool than open your mouth and remove all doubt. The answers to your questions are readily available on the internet. Why are you even reading this article if you have so little knowledge of this area?
1. no network can handle all its subscribers at once. Think of AT&T. Duh.
2. Up to 100Mb/s is the technical limit of the technology. Current implementation is nowhere close to that, so yes, that part is mostly hype.
3. 100 Mbps is per customer, but can be limited by # of cell recievers and total backhaul limit of the tower (That is the tower's internet connection speed).
dirk_bruere
not rated yet Nov 26, 2010
My area currently does up to 50Mb optics, and I subscribe to 20Mb (and actually get it most of the time). While wireless is clearly useful I definitely prefer a cable for its bandwidth for fixed machines eg the one I work on at home or work. I also prefer cabling at home in preference to wifi.
ormondotvos
not rated yet Nov 26, 2010
Having just canceled Comcast after two weeks, due to very slow (likely oversubscribed) fiber optic internet, I'd point out that any system can be overloaded, and probably will be due to greed of corporations.

And consider that you have to consider the capability of the server you're connected to, which might also be subject to oversubscription at the server farm.

I went back to lmi.net, where I get what I pay for, 99% of the time.

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