Ford announces which cities will get first crack at Focus Electric

Nov 22, 2010 By Melissa Hincha-Ownby

Ford's first all-electric, zero emissions vehicle, the Ford Focus Electric, will go on sale in late 2011. As is the case with the Chevy Volt and the Nissan Leaf, initial availability will be limited to certain markets. Ford has announced that the first wave of Ford Focus Electric sales will be made in 19 American cities.

In late 2011, customers in the following market will be eligible to purchase Ford's first electric vehicle: Atlanta; Austin, Texas; Houston; Boston; Chicago; Denver; Detroit; Los Angeles, San Francisco and San Diego; New York, Orlando, Fla.; Phoenix; Tucson, Ariz.; Portland, Ore.; Raleigh Durham, N.C.; Richmond, Va.; Seattle; and Washington, D.C.

The markets were chosen for several reasons including current hybrid purchasing trends, the acceptance of electric vehicle technology by local governments and the potential to collaborate with utility companies.

"Making a viable option for consumers requires teamwork across a variety of industries and government entities," said Nancy Gioia, director of Global Electrification, Ford Motor Company. "Working with utilities, governments and technology companies is a key part of our electric strategy to make sure the infrastructure and support for electric vehicles is in place as we begin rolling them out."

The Ford Focus Electric will be powered by a 23 kWh lithium-ion battery with an estimated 100-mile range that can be recharged by both 120V and 240V power sources. Compact Power Inc, located in Holland, Mich., will manufacture the battery. The Focus Electric will be built alongside the standard Focus at the Michigan .

After release in the United States, the Ford Focus Electric is scheduled to be introduced to the European market in 2012. The Focus Electric is the first of five electrified vehicles that Ford plans to introduce in the coming years.

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justinius
1 / 5 (1) Nov 22, 2010
Who Killed The Electric Car? Glad we're moving forward, It's just happening 20+ years later than it should have.
ueli
not rated yet Nov 22, 2010
Good to see another company building a pure electric car(again!). Why only a 100 mile range which in reality is only about 60 to 70 miles? BYD in China are building one with at least 250 km range ( 160 miles ) and in 1908 (yes that is correct!) the Fritchle car did 100 miles on lead acid batteries, admittadly at a top speed of about 25 miles per hour.
Maybe todays car manufacturers don't really want to sell them and want to kill it again!
gopher65
not rated yet Nov 22, 2010
You can easily build a 250km range car... if you remove all safety equipment, radio, air conditioner, make everything in the car manual (including steering), remove ABS and other breaking system enhancements, and completely gut the frame of the car so that it is nothing more than a plastic box with wheels and batteries.

Course, would anyone want to drive such an inherently unsafe, slow, ugly, uncomfortable, expensive (for what you're getting) vehicle? No, of course not. Plus it wouldn't pass safety requirements for road travel.
SunnyDaze
not rated yet Nov 23, 2010
So when I charge these cars at home, Is the road tax included?
Eikka
5 / 5 (1) Nov 23, 2010
Why only a 100 mile range which in reality is only about 60 to 70 miles? BYD in China are building one with at least 250 km range ( 160 miles )


And you believe them?

It's relatively easy to make an electric car go far by dropping the average speed, since air resistance increases exponentially. The only thing that stops these kind of companies from claiming 500 mile ranges is that the efficiency of the motor drops if you go too slow.
jimbo92107
5 / 5 (1) Nov 23, 2010
Ford is scared to bring their little battery buggies to Minnesota. See how far they go when it's -30F outside and you have to blast the heater so your hands don't freeze on the steering wheel!

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