US bans 'fake' marijuana chemicals

Nov 24, 2010

US authorities slapped a temporary ban Wednesday on chemicals used to make so-called "fake marijuana" that has been used as a legal alternative to pot.

The Drug Enforcement Administration said it was using its emergency authority to temporarily control the five chemicals used for products with names such as "Spice," "K2," "Blaze," and "Red X Dawn," which are labeled as incense to mask their intended purpose.

"Over the past year, smokable herbal blends marketed as being 'legal' and providing a marijuana-like high, have become increasingly popular, particularly among teens and young adults," the DEA said in a statement.

"These products consist of plant material that has been coated with research chemicals that mimic THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, and are sold at a variety of retail outlets, in head shops and over the Internet."

The DEA said however that the products have not been approved for human consumption and there is no oversight of the manufacturing process.

The banned chemicals are JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-200, CP-47,497, and cannabicyclohexanol, which are used to make "fake pot" products.

The DEA action makes possession or sale of the chemicals or the products that contain them illegal for at least one year while a review is conducted.

"The American public looks to the DEA to protect its children and communities from those who would exploit them for their own gain," said DEA acting administrator Michele Leonhart.

"Makers of these harmful products mislead their customers into thinking that 'fake pot' is a harmless alternative to , but that is not the case."

The substances are already banned in 15 US states and several European nations.

Explore further: Patients must not be forced to choose between easier access and continuity of care

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

SLU toxicologist warning to parents: Look for signs of K2

Mar 03, 2010

In the last month, Anthony Scalzo, M.D., professor of toxicology at Saint Louis University, has seen nearly 30 cases involving teenagers who were experiencing hallucinations, severe agitation, elevated heart rate and blood ...

DEA: Clean out your medicine cabinets Saturday

Sep 23, 2010

(AP) -- Tim Strain was a victim of prescription drugs, not an abuser. His girlfriend's mother gave the 18-year-old additional pain medication for a serious burn, producing a fatal drug interaction.

Britain bans 'legal high' drugs

Dec 23, 2009

Britain banned several drugs known as "legal highs" Wednesday amid mounting public concern about their health risks.

Recommended for you

Moderate alcohol consumption increases attractiveness

53 minutes ago

Consuming alcohol (equivalent to about a glass of wine) can make the drinker appear more attractive than when sober, according to new research from the University of Bristol. However, the effect disappears ...

Teenage TV audiences and energy drink advertisements

4 hours ago

Researchers at Dartmouth College examined a database of television advertisements broadcast between March 2012 and February 2013 on 139 network and cable channels and found that more than 608 hours of advertisements for energy ...

How drinking behavior changes through the years

12 hours ago

In the UK, frequent drinking becomes more common in middle to old age, especially amongst men, according to research published in the open access journal, BMC Medicine. Doctors are seeing a growing number ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

neiorah
not rated yet Nov 24, 2010
At least we know the affects of pot

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.