Britain considering plain cigarette packs

Nov 21, 2010

Tobacco companies could be forced to sell cigarettes in plain grey or brown packaging in Britain in an attempt to deter youngsters from taking up smoking, the health secretary suggested Sunday.

Andrew Lansley is considering switching all brand packs to a standard colour in the belief that brightly coloured packages lure prospective smokers from a young age.

A spokeswoman from the Department of Health said colourful packs were widely accepted as the last form of marketing available for tobacco companies to recruit new smokers.

The current intention is to ask retailers to cover up their displays of so that children are not attracted by the packaging, but ministers want to examine the use of plain packets as well.

Ministers want to see if changing cigarette packet appearance could deter children from taking up and support people who are trying to quit, the spokeswoman said.

Plain packs would just show only basic information and health and picture warnings.

"We have to try new approaches and take decisions to benefit the population," Lansley said.

"That's why I want to look at the idea of plain packaging. The evidence is clear that packaging helps to recruit smokers, so it makes sense to consider having less attractive packaging.

"The levels of and deaths from smoking are still far too high, and the cost to the National Health Service (NHS) and the economy is vast. That money could be used to educate our children and treat cancer."

Campaigners Action on Smoking and Health called for Lansley to set a date for switching the packets.

"We're glad the secretary of state recognises the harm done by brightly coloured tobacco packaging in helping hook children and young people on tobacco," said chief executive Deborah Arnott.

"If he is serious about putting in plain, standardised packs then he should set a date now for when the law will come before parliament and when it will come into force."

The Department of Health said 337,000 people stopped smoking last year with the help of free support from the NHS and the number of in Britain has fallen by a quarter in the past decade.

In 2007 more than 80,000 deaths and 1.4 million hospital admissions were attributed to smoking.

Explore further: Oil-swishing craze: Snake oil or all-purpose remedy?

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Retail tobacco displays make it tougher to quit

Feb 07, 2008

Tobacco advertising displays may be undermining smokers' attempts to give up and tempting former smokers to resume smoking, research by Professor of Marketing Janet Hoek has found.

WHO: Get more graphic with smokers

May 29, 2009

(AP) -- Cigarette packages should include images of sickness and suffering caused by tobacco, along with written warnings, the World Health Organization said Friday.

Smokers at risk from their own 'second-hand' smoke

Jan 29, 2010

It is well known that smokers damage their health by directly inhaling cigarette smoke. Now, research published in BioMed Central's open access journal Environmental Health has shown that they are at additional risk from b ...

Drop in UK teenage smokers

Aug 18, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- The number of 16- and 17-year-old UK smokers has dropped since it became illegal to sell cigarettes to under-18s according to new UCL research published today in the journal Addiction.

Recommended for you

Suddenly health insurance is not for sale

Apr 18, 2014

(HealthDay)— Darlene Tucker, an independent insurance broker in Scotts Hill, Tenn., says health insurers in her area aren't selling policies year-round anymore.

Study: Half of jailed NYC youths have brain injury (Update)

Apr 18, 2014

About half of all 16- to 18-year-olds coming into New York City's jails say they had a traumatic brain injury before being incarcerated, most caused by assaults, according to a new study that's the latest in a growing body ...

Autonomy and relationships among 'good life' goals

Apr 18, 2014

Young adults with Down syndrome have a strong desire to be self-sufficient by living independently and having a job, according to a study into the meaning of wellbeing among young people affected by the disorder.

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Telekinetic
1 / 5 (2) Nov 21, 2010
I just walked by a foursome of smokers outside a bar when I overheard one of them, a woman, proudly announce that she was a cancer survivor. Tobacco is the most insidious recreational drug, as people will defend their right to become ill. I quit smoking when my mother was diagnosed with lung cancer and subsequently died 10 months later. It's been 5 years and it still feels like an avoidable tragedy. When your broker invests in the stock market, your money may be invested in tobacco, a surefire return despite Big Tobacco's setbacks.
Shootist
1 / 5 (1) Nov 21, 2010
"Forget conservative or liberal, Tory or Labor; there are only two types of people in the world, those who would control the actions of others, and those who have no such desire" - Robert A. Heinlein

More news stories

Cancer stem cells linked to drug resistance

Most drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers also promote drug-resistance and ultimately spur tumor growth. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered ...

Easter morning delivery for space station

Space station astronauts got a special Easter treat: a cargo ship full of supplies. The shipment arrived Sunday morning via the SpaceX company's Dragon cargo capsule.