Western diet exacerbates sepsis

Oct 19, 2010

High fat diets cause a dramatic immune system overreaction to sepsis, a condition of systemic bacterial infection. An experimental study in mice, published in the open access journal BMC Physiology, has shown that a diet high in saturated fat, sugars and cholesterol greatly exaggerates the inflammatory response to sepsis.

Chantal Rivera, PhD Associate Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-Shreveport, said that "Mortality due to sepsis in morbidly obese subjects is estimated to be 7 times more prevalent compared to mortality in lean individuals. Morbidity in obese patients is also more severe. Results from our recent studies suggest that this adverse outcome may be caused by consuming a high-fat diet, which predisposes the immune system to react more strongly to infection".

Dr. Rivera lead a team of researchers to carry out the surgical induction of sepsis in mice that had been fed normal chow or western diet for 3 weeks. Mice on the , which was enriched in saturated fat, showed exacerbated inflammation that was found to be mediated by signaling via the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) pathway. According to Dr Rivera, "These results suggest that targeting the TLR signaling pathway as a therapeutic approach to the medical management of may be especially beneficial in obese patients".

Explore further: Europe's police crack massive horsemeat trafficking ring

More information: Western diet enhances hepatic inflammation in mice exposed to cecal ligation and puncture, Chantal A Rivera, LaTausha Gaskin, Georg Singer, Jeff Houghton and Monique Allman, BMC Physiology (in press),

Related Stories

Fatty food can weaken the immune system

Dec 08, 2009

Fresh evidence that fatty food is bad for our health has come to light: mice fed a lard-based diet over a long period got worse at fighting bacteria in the blood, reveals a thesis from the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University ...

Researchers make blood poisoning breakthrough

Jun 04, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- The lives of millions of people struck down by blood poisoning - or sepsis - could be saved after a team of researchers, including an expert from the University of Glasgow, made a medical breakthrough in ...

Stem-cell therapy may provide new approach to fight infection

Jul 01, 2010

A new study from researchers in Ottawa and Toronto suggests that a commonly used type of bone marrow stem cell may be able to help treat sepsis, a deadly condition that can occur when an infection spreads throughout the body. ...

Recommended for you

Europe's police crack massive horsemeat trafficking ring

Apr 25, 2015

Police from seven European countries detained 26 people in a crackdown on a horsemeat trafficking ring two years after a tainted meat scandal that rocked the continent, the EU's judicial agency Eurojust said Saturday.

Text messaging useful for reaching 'at-risk' teens about sex

Apr 24, 2015

Text messaging that connects teens with sexual health educators is effective for delivering sexual health information, according to a recent study in The Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University.The ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.