Shock tactics: Bioelectrical therapy for cancer and birth defects?

Oct 19, 2010

Stem cell therapies hold increasing promise as a cure for multiple diseases. But the massive potential of a healthy stem cell has a flip side, as faulty regulation of stem cells leads to a huge range of human diseases. Even before birth, mistakes made by the stem cells of the foetus are a major cause of congenital defects, and cancer is also caused by the body losing control of stem cell function. Guiding stem cells along the correct pathways and, where necessary, reversing their mistakes is the goal of everyone in this field.

Now, Michael Levin and colleagues from Tufts University, Medford, MA, have identified a novel and readily modifiable signal by which an organism can control the behaviour of stem cell . Their work is published in & Mechanisms on October 19th, 2010.

Levin's laboratory works on an intriguing phenomenon: bioelectrical signalling. There is always a difference in voltage, called the transmembrane potential, between the inside and outside of all cells, and controlling exactly what this difference is turns out to be vitally important. Specialised protein checkpoints sited in a cell's outer membrane regulate ion flow in and out of the cell, producing voltage gradients. These, combined with more conventional protein-based signalling systems, can specify cell destiny.

Levin's team already knew from collaborative work with David Kaplan's lab, also at Tufts, that the properties of human growing in artificial culture could be drastically altered by changing their transmembrane potential. Now they have taken this work one important step further, by asking whether tampering with the transmembrane potential of one kind of cell can have a domino effect in a whole organism, altering the destiny of other cell types. To do this, they focused on the development of neural crest stem cells, which are responsible for directing development of the face and heart, but which also generate melanocytes, the pigment cells of the skin.

Using frog tadpoles and melanocytes as a model system, they showed that tweaking the transmembrane potential of a tiny population of 'instructor' cells sends a signal to developing melanocytes that causes them to overgrow and start to resemble metastatic cancer cells. Most excitingly, they found that the signal can travel over long distances in the tadpole, and that the messenger carrying it is serotonin – an important neurotransmitter involved in mood regulation and many other aspects of nervous system function.

This novel bioelectrical method of changing stem cell behaviour has huge implications. It is very likely that there are similar 'instructor' cells that direct other important cell populations, and changing their voltage gradients would be relatively easy (Levin's lab simply used an anti-parasitic drug already available on prescription). The resulting bioelectrical therapy could potentially be harnessed to improve regenerative repair after injury, repair birth defects and detect and prevent .

Explore further: US scientists make embryonic stem cells from adult skin

More information: Douglas Blackiston, Dany S. Adams, Joan M. Lemire, Maria Lobikin and Michael Levin (2010). Transmembrane potential of GlyCl-expressing instructor cells induces a neoplastic-like conversion of melanocytes via a serotonergic pathway. Dis. Model. Mech. [in press] dmm.biologists.org/

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New 'control knobs' for stem cells identified

Dec 03, 2008

Natural changes in voltage that occur across the membrane of adult human stem cells are a powerful controlling factor in the process by which these stem cells differentiate, according to research published by Tufts University ...

New study hopeful on neural stem cells

Aug 05, 2006

Neural stem cells derived from federally approved human embryonic cells are inferior to stem cells derived from donated fetal tissue, a new study found.

Recommended for you

Leeches help save woman's ear after pit bull mauling

Apr 18, 2014

(HealthDay)—A pit bull attack in July 2013 left a 19-year-old woman with her left ear ripped from her head, leaving an open wound. After preserving the ear, the surgical team started with a reconnection ...

New pain relief targets discovered

Apr 17, 2014

Scientists have identified new pain relief targets that could be used to provide relief from chemotherapy-induced pain. BBSRC-funded researchers at King's College London made the discovery when researching ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Filipino tests negative for Middle East virus

A Filipino nurse who tested positive for the Middle East virus has been found free of infection in a subsequent examination after he returned home, Philippine health officials said Saturday.

Study says we're over the hill at 24

(Medical Xpress)—It's a hard pill to swallow, but if you're over 24 years of age you've already reached your peak in terms of your cognitive motor performance, according to a new Simon Fraser University study.

NASA's space station Robonaut finally getting legs

Robonaut, the first out-of-this-world humanoid, is finally getting its space legs. For three years, Robonaut has had to manage from the waist up. This new pair of legs means the experimental robot—now stuck ...

Ex-Apple chief plans mobile phone for India

Former Apple chief executive John Sculley, whose marketing skills helped bring the personal computer to desktops worldwide, says he plans to launch a mobile phone in India to exploit its still largely untapped ...

Egypt archaeologists find ancient writer's tomb

Egypt's minister of antiquities says a team of Spanish archaeologists has discovered two tombs in the southern part of the country, one of them belonging to a writer and containing a trove of artifacts including reed pens ...

Airbnb rental site raises $450 mn

Online lodging listings website Airbnb inked a $450 million funding deal with investors led by TPG, a source close to the matter said Friday.