Population report: More Jews live in the US than in Israel

Oct 21, 2010

Researchers from the University of Miami (UM) and the University of Connecticut (UConn) have published a 2010 report on the American Jewish population, as part of a new North American Jewish Data Bank Report series.

The new report called Jewish Population in the United States-2010 shows a greater number of Jews in the U.S. than in Israel. While the article puts the total number of Jews in the U.S. at around 6.5 million, the authors recognize there may be some double counting in the methodology and believe the number to be fewer than 6.4 million.

Interestingly, the U.S. report contradicts the estimate that will appear in the World Jewish Population Report to be issued in the near future in the same report series, which will show 5.3 million U.S. Jews, explains Ira Sheskin, professor of Geography and Regional Studies at UM College of Arts and Sciences and lead author of this report.

"The article on the Jewish Population in the U.S. shows a greater number of Jews in the U.S. than in Israel, while the World Report will claim the opposite," says Sheskin. The difference is in the methodology. "While the World Report uses national studies for its estimate, the U.S. Report sums up estimates of the Jewish population in over 1,000 local Jewish communities to develop a national estimate," says Sheskin, who is also director of the Jewish Demography Project at the Sue and Leonard Miller Center for Contemporary Judaic Studies at UM.

The report was published by the Mandell L. Berman-North American Jewish Data Bank at the University of Connecticut, in coordination with the Association for the Social Scientific Study of Jewry (ASSJ) and Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA). The data collected previously made possible an analysis of the Jewish population by U.S. Congressional districts for the first time, explains Arnold Dashefsky, professor of sociology at UConn and co-author of this report.

"Each report that we have prepared, including reports for 2006, 2007, and 2008, is better than the previous one because we continue to add new scientific estimates and discover new concentrations of Jews in local communities," says Dashefsky, who is also director of the Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life at UConn.

Other findings in the report include:

  • New Internet-based estimates of small Jewish communities that had not been included in previous reports
  • Vignettes of seven US communities: The Berkshires, MA; Broward County, FL; Cincinnati, OH; Hartford, CT; Middlesex County, NJ; Phoenix, AZ and Pittsburgh, PA.
  • Comparisons among local Jewish communities on four different criteria: percentage of persons in Jewish households in a community age 65 and over; percentage of adult children who remain in their parents' community when they establish their own homes; emotional attachment to Israel; and the percentage and number of Holocaust survivors and children of survivors.
  • Some community estimates show marked increases in population, mainly because the data had not been updated yearly. Philadelphia increased to 214,600 Jews from 206,100 Jews in 1997; and Portland, OR increased to 42,000 Jews from the former estimate of 25,500 Jews.
  • Other increases are reported as a result of new methodology. Orange County, CA shows an increase of 33 percent; Ocean County, NJ, a 36 percent increase; and Dutchess County, NY, a 138 percent increase.
  • Only two show significant decreases in Jewish . Buffalo, NY decreased to 13,000 Jews from 18,500 Jews in 1995; and Dayton, OH decreased to 4,000 Jews from the former estimate of 5,000 Jews.

Explore further: Newlyweds, be careful what you wish for

More information: The data will be accessible to researchers via an online spreadsheet, which will allow Sheskin and Dashefsky to update information as new estimates are obtained. The report is available at: www.jewishdatabank.org

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User comments : 9

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Vendicar_Decarian
1.8 / 5 (5) Oct 21, 2010
Why does anyone care?

Is anyone counting the number of former Icelanders in the U.S.?

The real question is how to remove the thieving, murderous Israelis from the land they have stolen from the Palestinian people since the war they started in 1967.

Skepticus
2 / 5 (4) Oct 22, 2010
I wonder how many stars left on the USA flag are not star of david now?
Modernmystic
1 / 5 (3) Oct 22, 2010
I wonder how many stars left on the USA flag are not star of david now?


I wonder how many bigots it takes to screw in a light bulb.
Husky
3 / 5 (4) Oct 22, 2010
i think you will need a whole lot of them as they prefer to argue over who gets to do it and remain in the dark instead
Skepticus
2 / 5 (4) Oct 22, 2010
I wonder how many bigots it takes to screw in a light bulb.


3. One American to handover the lightbulb (made in China), one Palestinian who do the job, and one Israelis who ordered and approved the whole thing.
Modernmystic
1 / 5 (3) Oct 22, 2010
I wonder how many bigots it takes to screw in a light bulb.


3. One American to handover the lightbulb (made in China), one Palestinian who do the job, and one Israelis who ordered and approved the whole thing.


You should get a job writing racist jokes, you seem to have all the qualifications necessary.
Skepticus
3.4 / 5 (5) Oct 22, 2010
I wonder how many bigots it takes to screw in a light bulb.


3. One American to handover the lightbulb (made in China), one Palestinian who do the job, and one Israelis who ordered and approved the whole thing.


You should get a job writing racist jokes, you seem to have all the qualifications necessary.

Interesting to see that ANY negative remark against Jew/Israel is immediately condemned by the ever ready hordes of Internet monitors as racist, as if they trademarked the term. Untold silent people of the world are fedup with Jews settlers land graps antics, while the US taxpayers have to underwrites the costs in human lives, money and gets all the blame in ME. With friend like Israel,the powerful AIPAC and the like, why should the US needs enemies?
Quantum_Conundrum
2.3 / 5 (3) Oct 22, 2010
Why does anyone care?

Is anyone counting the number of former Icelanders in the U.S.?

The real question is how to remove the thieving, murderous Israelis from the land they have stolen from the Palestinian people since the war they started in 1967.



Wow. You know nothing, or else you're just a liar.

Which is it?
otto1932
2 / 5 (3) Oct 22, 2010
I wonder how many bigots it takes to screw in a light bulb.


3. One American to handover the lightbulb (made in China), one Palestinian who do the job, and one Israelis who ordered and approved the whole thing.
You should get a job writing racist jokes, you seem to have all the qualifications necessary.
-Says the exclusionary religionist, trying to pretend that his particular sect or cult hasn't convinced him that he's just a little closer to god than the next. Religionists are bigots by definition, although they will often don the cloak of ecumenicism to make themselves appear just a little bit better still.
Wow. You know nothing, or else you're just a liar.
Which is it? Gosh that sounds familiar.

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