Obama signs technology access bill for disabled

October 8, 2010

(AP) -- Blind and deaf people soon will be able to more easily use smart phones, the Internet and other technologies that have become staples of life and the workplace.

A bill President signed into law Friday has been a priority of advocates for the millions of Americans who cannot see or hear.

The new law sets federal guidelines for the to ensure that the blind can get to the Internet using devices such as . They'll also be able to hear audible descriptions of what's happening on TV screens.

For the deaf and hearing impaired, the law requires captioning of TV programs on the Internet. Equipment used for Internet telephone calls also must be compatible with hearing aids.

Explore further: Briefs: Japan debates on Internet TV patent law


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