Nokia Siemens Networks achieves world record copper DSL speeds

October 31, 2010

Nokia Siemens Networks has successfully tested a technology that could drastically increase the data carrying capacity of standard copper wires. The company achieved data transmission speeds of 825 megabits per second (Mbps) over 400 meters of bonded copper lines and 750 Mbps over 500 meters.

At these speeds, network operators could optimize existing, widely deployed copper infrastructure to provide bandwidth-intensive services for years to come.

used circuits that involve the creation of a virtual - or 'phantom' - channel to supplement the two physical wires that are the standard configuration for copper transmission lines. The approach, known as Phantom DSL is also being showcased during Broadband World Forum 2010 in Paris,
October 26 - 28.

“Laying down new optical fiber to the home remains costly, though it is capable of delivering very high speeds and is a definite solution for long-term bandwidth requirements,” said Eduard Scheiterer, head of broadband access business line, Nokia Siemens Networks. “However, the innovative use of technologies such as phantom circuits helps operators provide an efficient last mile connectivity with existing .”

Phantom DSL promises a bandwidth increase of 50-75% over existing bonded . This prolongs the life of copper networks, delaying the need for fiber rollout and protecting operator’s existing capital investments. The promised high speeds will enable a whole new range of end-user services and open up new revenue opportunities for operators. The technology could be used to test initial demand for very high services.

Nokia Siemens Networks’ Phantom DSL will become an integral part of the company’s DSLAM (Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer) products hiX 562x/3x.

Explore further: Fiber-optic speeds achieved over copper lines

Related Stories

Fiber-optic speeds achieved over copper lines

April 28, 2010

( -- Bell Labs, Alcatel-Lucent's research arm, has demonstrated industry record broadband download speeds of up to 300 Megabits per second using two traditional twisted pair copper telephone lines. The achievement ...

Optical Broadband Data Transmission in the Home

March 27, 2007

Siemens and Infineon have developed a simple broadband transmission system for use in home networks. The system uses optical polymer cables that can be laid and installed without requiring any special skills.

Telstra strikes $10B deal for Australia broadband

June 20, 2010

(AP) -- The government and Australia's largest telecommunications company announced a deal Sunday that clears a major hurdle to Prime Minister Kevin Rudd's plans for a superfast national broadband network.

Recommended for you

Making it easier to collaborate on code

October 26, 2016

Git is an open-source system with a polarizing reputation among programmers. It's a powerful tool to help developers track changes to code, but many view it as prohibitively difficult to use.

Dutch unveil giant vacuum to clean outside air

October 25, 2016

Dutch inventors Tuesday unveiled what they called the world's first giant outside air vacuum cleaner—a large purifying system intended to filter out toxic tiny particles from the atmosphere surrounding the machine.


Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

not rated yet Nov 01, 2010
Hmm. That sounds way optimistic. Getting that kind of speed over a pair of non-network designed copper phone cable is pretty spectacular.
not rated yet Nov 01, 2010
Phantom virtual channels? Is this still TEM wave technology or are we entering the 'single wire' longitudinal electric field signal era?

William Fogal predicted 100MHz signal frequencies over copper lines long time ago, by means of his patented 'Fogal transistor'.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.