Microsoft sends Office into the Internet 'cloud'

Oct 19, 2010
Microsoft on Tuesday sent its Office business suite into the Internet "cloud" as it further adapted to a shift away from the packaged software on which the firm's fortunes were built.

Microsoft on Tuesday sent its Office business suite into the Internet "cloud" as it further adapted to a shift away from the packaged software on which the firm's fortunes were built.

Microsoft Office 365 joined SharePoint, Exchange, and Lync programs that can be "rented" as online services, sparing companies the expense and hassle of buying, installing and maintaining the software on their computers.

"We embraced the cloud because we actually believed it would change the way people work," said Office division president Kurt DelBene. "People can focus on their business while we and our partners take care of the technology."

Microsoft planned a mid-day launch of a website Office365.com where businesses tiny or huge could sign up to take part in a test, or beta, program.

A public version of the cloud service will be available worldwide next year, executives said.

Office 365 for small businesses or professionals can be set up in as few as 15 minutes and subscriptions cost six dollars per month per user.

Software packages tailored to the needs of large businesses will be available for monthly per-user subscriptions ranging from two dollars to 27 dollars.

"This is a wonderful growth opportunity for Microsoft," said Microsoft senior vice president Chris Capossela said while demonstrating Office 365 at a press event in San Francisco.

"Traditionally, Microsoft has only competed in the software space. With this, we are actually in a much larger pool of IT spend because we are in a place to run their network."

Microsoft began offering its popular as "cloud" services a couple of years ago in the face of a trend championed by Internet titan .

Providing Office as an online service will mean that Outlook exchange and document programs that have been fixtures on business networks will be accessible through smartphones, tablets, and other gadgets used by an increasingly mobile workforce.

"We are at a pivot point in the adoption of cloud services," DelBene said. "Customers are no longer asking whether to move to the cloud, but when and how."

Companies in 40 countries use cloud services offered by Microsoft, according to DelBene.

"The cloud actually changes the rules of business for our customers," DelBene said. "A business now basically gets an elastic IT capacity. Small companies can have the capabilities of big corporations at low cost."

Features offered as cloud services by Microsoft include video conferencing, social networking, and voice mail sent to email inboxes.

Explore further: Breakthrough elastic cloud-to cloud networking

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Google wooing Microsoft business customers

Oct 19, 2009

Google on Monday ramped up a campaign to convert businesses worldwide into users of email, calendar, document and other software programs it offers online as services on the Internet.

Microsoft moving Office online in duel with Google

Jul 13, 2009

Microsoft on Monday said that the 2010 version of its popular Office software will feature online collaboration as the technology giant duels "in the cloud" with Internet titan Google.

Microsoft looks to 'cloud' with Office 2010

May 12, 2010

Microsoft released the latest update to its popular Office software on Wednesday including a Web-hosted version aimed at countering competition from emerging "cloud" products offered by Google.

Recommended for you

Body by smartphone

3 hours ago

We love our smartphones. Since they marched out of the corporate world and into the hands of consumers about 10 years ago, we've relied more and more on our iPhone and Android devices to organize our schedules, ...

Breakthrough elastic cloud-to cloud networking

4 hours ago

Scientists from AT&T, IBM and Applied Communication Sciences (ACS) announced a proof-of-concept technology that reduces set up times for cloud-to-cloud connectivity from days to seconds. This advance is a major step forward ...

Security CTO to detail Android Fake ID flaw at Black Hat

18 hours ago

Where have you heard this before: A team of security researchers discover a security flaw in Android devices. This is, however, news. This time, experts are talking about a flaw that involves a widespread ...

Software provides a clear overview in long documents

Jul 25, 2014

In the future, a software will help users better analyze long texts such as the documents for calls for bids, which are often more than one thousand pages long. Experts at Siemens' global research unit Corporate ...

User comments : 9

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Bob_B
2.7 / 5 (6) Oct 19, 2010
Why would anyone want to store data and use apps that must take input over the Internet? The opportunity to scrape data off the net is increasing ever so fast - with no way to deal with it, except to add encryption that is really really good. Then that adds time to transmission and adds space for storage then more time to fetch/transmit and decrypt at the local machine.

My doctor can't even keep their PC's safe from ID theft and 'they' think we should store all our data in the 'cloud?'

The 'cloud' is just a marketing word for a piece of hardware we all know affectionately as "a server" which must go fetch data from some type of data base and then 'server' it back to you.

Oh, you can't access your data...gee the cloud must have evaporated, lol.
NameIsNotNick
3 / 5 (2) Oct 19, 2010
The 'cloud' is just a marketing word for a piece of hardware we all know affectionately as "a server" which must go fetch data from some type of data base and then 'server' it back to you.


No, it's an application server, not a data server... and it's set up very differently than a typical LAN server...
Roj
1 / 5 (2) Oct 19, 2010
If you can't get to heaven on your merits then owning the clouds may guarantee a reserved seat, but either way your terrestrial-business cycle must have flat lined.
stealthc
3.7 / 5 (3) Oct 19, 2010
if I owned a business there would be no way in hell I would put my sensitive documents online for either google or microsoft to "manage". Are people really that stupid?
Quantum_Conundrum
2 / 5 (2) Oct 19, 2010
stealthc:

yes, they are that stupid. About 40% of people drink alcohol and another 40% smoke cigarettes, even though they know they will die sooner and more painfully because of it.

You have to remember, in capitalism you don't necessarily need a good product or even a safe product to make money. You just need to sell a product to stupid people, and do it slightly better than your competitor.

Seriously though, there are some advantages to cloud computing and data centers. individual businesses don't always have the resources to invest in high end servers to run their online applications, and it gives an off-site location to store data in the same swoop.

In the end, your documents are probably more secure with the cloud than they are within your own company, as no individual human is even going to know what documents are stored by whom on which individual machine. Only the software really knows.
derricka
not rated yet Oct 19, 2010
re. Microsoft sends Office into the Internet 'cloud'

Microsoft may as well send it to Pluto. Here's hoping they do.
Riff
not rated yet Oct 20, 2010
Have you noticed that because of 'clouding', Adobe and others think its ok to download and install 'upgrades' without your permission? Did you order it? No. Did they notify you that its downloading? No. Having had computer problems due to upgrades, and you want to make sure you only upgrade when you want, did you have a choice? No. Too bad. However.. most wont care because the 'cloud' has been sending them stuff all day, and they missed that one of those silent downloads wasn't even from Adobe. It was a virus from somewhere else. Oops. Get ready for a wave of exploits on YOUR system. Not to mention millions of peoples data can be stolen in one swoop on THEIR system. This has catastrophe written all over it.
Riff
not rated yet Oct 20, 2010
stealthc:
no individual human is even going to know what documents are stored by whom on which individual machine. Only the software really knows.


Except that disgruntled employee.
El_Nose
not rated yet Oct 21, 2010
@Riff

actually there is a user setting that can disable autoupdates. You should check for it on any software you buy. And Adobe's is easy to find -- but it is unwelcomingly annoying... it will ask you every boot up to update and almost daily until you give in ... normally this is a benefit to the user to protect them from issues... but I still like to be in control of my computer going out and downloading data... even though I probably have a virus I am unaware of sending e-mails to people... I still try