Michigan to get 5,300 charging stations for electric cars

Oct 13, 2010
A Chevrolet Volt electric vehicle seen here October 7 charging at a solar-powered charging station in Detroit, Michigan. More than 5,300 charging stations will be installed in Michigan as the birthplace of the US auto industry prepares for the introduction of electric cars.

More than 5,300 charging stations will be installed in Michigan as the birthplace of the US auto industry prepares for the introduction of electric cars like the Chevrolet Volt, General Motors said.

The bulk of the charging stations will be installed in private homes by local utility companies and more than 1,500 Chevrolet dealers across the United States also plan to install charging stations for customers.

GM said it will install 350 stations for its employees at facilities across Michigan.

"We think this opens up doors for those Volt owners who want to charge at work or who don't have a place at home to charge the car overnight," Tom Stephens, GM vice chairman for global product operations told an electric vehicle conference Tuesday.

"They'll be able to drive electrically when they can, and they can drive on gasoline when they need to."

The Volt will be launched late this year in Michigan, California, Texas, Washington and New York.

It can reach speeds up to 100 miles per hour (160 kilometers) on alone, Stephens insisted as he dismissed a recent controversy among the industry press that the Volt should be considered a hybrid, rather than a fully electric vehicle.

The Volt is also equipped with a gasoline-powered engine so it won't stall in the middle of the road if owners drive too far without a charge.

GM says it can drive 25 to 50 miles (40 to 82 kilometers) on a single charge and up to 310 miles (500 kilometers) with the help of the gasoline engine.

Stephens said that gas-powered motor does not actually drive the Volt but instead powers the electric motor, a new type of system for which GM recently obtained a patent.

"We came up with a unique power flow system that keeps electricity coming even when the battery is depleted," he told journalists on the sidelines of the conference.

"Any mechanical energy is converted specifically to electricity, even when the charge in the Volt's on board battery has been depleted."

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User comments : 11

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Shootist
1.7 / 5 (3) Oct 13, 2010
The chevy volt isn't an electric car.


Government Motors has been lying about that little fact. The Volt is nothing more that an underpowered Prius. It's engine CAN power the drive wheels alone, or in concert with its, less than 20 miles to a charge, battery.
holoman
2.3 / 5 (3) Oct 13, 2010
Michigan is leading the way to a cleaner environment.

I for one say, "Hooray for Michigan and the US !"
mertzj
5 / 5 (3) Oct 13, 2010
"We came up with a unique power flow system that keeps electricity coming even when the battery is depleted," he told journalists on the sidelines of the conference.

"Any mechanical energy is converted specifically to electricity, even when the charge in the Volt's on board battery has been depleted."

Obviously GM has no clue how trains have worked for decades and countless other equipment.
Parsec
1 / 5 (1) Oct 14, 2010
For the many of us that live close to work, and would use the Volt car for commuting, this is a wonderful solution. The long range with the battery means that if I do need to make an extra drive in the afternoon, I can just do it and the car won't run out of juice prematurely.
Roj
3 / 5 (1) Oct 14, 2010
GM said it will install 350 stations for its employees at facilities across Michigan.
Since the Volt runs on a dead battery, the 350 stations could drain employee car batteries to power the employer's facility during the day.

After paying to charge their battery at home the poor employees could find a dead battery after work, forcing them to fill with petrol, and burn fumes all the way home.
Eikka
1 / 5 (1) Oct 14, 2010
It can reach speeds up to 100 miles per hour (160 kilometers) on battery power alone


Yes, it can, but it won't. What about the part where the gasoline engine starts to drive the wheels at 60-70 mph?
mertzj
5 / 5 (1) Oct 14, 2010
It can reach speeds up to 100 miles per hour (160 kilometers) on battery power alone


Yes, it can, but it won't. What about the part where the gasoline engine starts to drive the wheels at 60-70 mph?


The engine never drives the wheels. It drives a generator that drives the electric motor.
Shootist
1.3 / 5 (3) Oct 14, 2010
It can reach speeds up to 100 miles per hour (160 kilometers) on battery power alone


Yes, it can, but it won't. What about the part where the gasoline engine starts to drive the wheels at 60-70 mph?


The engine never drives the wheels. It drives a generator that drives the electric motor.


Ipso, the Volt is a hybrid NOT a true Electric car.

Let's all jump on the Green Bubble, like the Tech bubble and the Housing bubble, before it. Oh Yeah, Algore will get rich, GE will get rich. The rest of us are hosed.
flying_finn
4 / 5 (1) Oct 14, 2010
Solar in Michigan? Not very efficient. Southwest, yes.
jalmy
1 / 5 (2) Oct 14, 2010
Most of your comments have been extemely small minded. The average internal combustion engine used today is 18-20% efficient. The rest is mostly wasted as heat. Every mile you can drive on electricity, generated and consumed with higher than 18-20% efficiency is a win. Period. Pull your heads out of your butts.
mertzj
2.5 / 5 (2) Oct 14, 2010
If you dont like technology what the hell are you doing reading physorg? In 20 years when everyones driving their electric car and your driving a gas car costing 10x more to drive are you going to be looking at all of them saying man you guys are getting hosed!! Let GE get rich. Way better then BP.