Satisfying job leads to better mental health

October 14, 2010

( -- If you want to have good mental health, it’s not enough to just have a job, you should also have a job that satisfies you, according to new research from The Australian National University.

The research, led by Dr. Liana Leach of the Centre for Research at ANU, found that employment isn’t always linked to better mental health. In fact, people who moved from unemployment into poor quality jobs were much more likely to be depressed than those who were still unemployed. The researchers’ work is published in this month’s BMC Public Health and is released as part of Mental Health Week.

“Our work found that people in poor quality jobs – jobs which were insecure, did not provide future job prospects or had high levels of strain – had no better mental health than people who were unemployed,” said Dr. Leach.

“In fact, the research showed that people who moved from being unemployed into poor quality were significantly more likely to be depressed at follow-up than those people who remained unemployed.”

Research generally shows that people who are employed have better mental health than those who are unemployed. The findings from this research indicate that things may not be that simple and that employers may need to be more aware of the roles they ask staff to perform.

“As a result of previous research there has been a focus on workforce participation as a means of improving people’s wellbeing – the idea being that if people get a job, their socio-economic, health and personal circumstances will improve,” said Dr. Leach.

“This research suggests getting people into any job may not necessarily lead to mental health improvements. Instead, people need good quality work to gain and maintain better wellbeing.

“It highlights the importance of employers striving to provide good quality work environments, which are associated with good workplace support, job security and realistic work demands,” said Dr. Leach.

Explore further: A Job Today Helps Keep the Doctor Away

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5 / 5 (1) Oct 14, 2010
Call me crazy but I'm sure we didn't need a study to find that out.
not rated yet Oct 15, 2010
I was wondering about the very same thing.
It's like saying that good things makes you feel good.

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