HP unveils 'Slate 500' tablet computer

Oct 22, 2010
Hewlett-Packard unveiled a Windows-powered touchscreen tablet computer aimed at professionals, the latest entry into a growing market dominated by Apple's iPad.

Hewlett-Packard unveiled a Windows-powered touchscreen tablet computer on Friday aimed at professionals, the latest entry into a growing market dominated by Apple's iPad.

The "HP Slate 500," which features an 8.9-inch (22.6-centimeter) screen, slightly smaller than the iPad's 9.7-inch (24.6-cm) display, costs 800 dollars, about the same price as the top-of-the-line iPad.

While the iPad is aimed more at consumers, HP is targeting its device at business customers and touting its ability to handle documents, spreadsheets and applications from Microsoft.

HP described the Slate 500 as the "ideal PC for professionals who don't usually work at a traditional desk, yet need to stay productive in a secure, familiar Windows environment."

"The ability to easily incorporate custom business applications differentiates this product and ultimately enhances the user experience and saves time for HP's business and enterprise customers," it said in a statement.

The Slate 500 weighs 1.5 pounds (0.68 kilos), the same as the iPad, and runs Windows 7, the latest version of Microsoft's computer .

It has two cameras -- one still and one video -- and a that allows a user to connect a keyboard, mouse or printer.

The Slate 500 offers Wi-Fi connectivity to the Internet but does not have 3G cellular access. It will be available only in the United States for the time being.

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The device has five hours of and comes with a digital stylus that lets users write notes directly on the screen.

HP unveiled the Slate 500 just two days after South Korea's Samsung announced it would begin selling its answer to the iPad, the Samsung Galaxy Tab, in the United States on November 11 for 600 dollars.

The Galaxy Tab, which is powered by Google's software, features a seven-inch (18-centimeter) touchscreen.

Apple chief executive slammed seven-inch tablets on Monday saying the screen was too small and the devices would be "dead on arrival."

According to market research firm Gartner, sales of tablet computers are expected to soar from nearly 20 million units this year to 55 million next year.

Apple sold 4.2 million iPads last quarter.

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User comments : 12

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thales
1 / 5 (3) Oct 22, 2010
A POS iPad clone. How exciting.
Nik_2213
not rated yet Oct 22, 2010
Smaller than an iPad ?? That's already too small, IMHO...
dirk_bruere
not rated yet Oct 22, 2010
"aimed at professionals" = too much $$$$
zslewis91
3 / 5 (2) Oct 22, 2010
A POS iPad clone. How exciting.


@thales, you are a retard. read somthing. retard
boznz
not rated yet Oct 22, 2010
Not interested.

What happened to the "Airlife 100" I *so* need a replacement for my 10 year old Compaq Areo 8000 with its proper 800x600 screen, proper instant on, proper keyboard and proper 10 hour+ battery life.
Quantum_Conundrum
not rated yet Oct 22, 2010
I don't like the idea of spending several hundred dollars for a hand held computer that doesn't even have enough battery life to last an entire work day, and doesn't have a keyboard.

Maybe it's just me, but I like the idea of gadgets that don't wear out every year,a nd that actually have power when and where you need it.
smokabowl420
1 / 5 (1) Oct 22, 2010
I don't like the idea of spending several hundred dollars for a hand held computer that doesn't even have enough battery life to last an entire work day, and doesn't have a keyboard.

Unfortunately, in our consumer-based society, thats just not going to happen. :(
Maybe it's just me, but I like the idea of gadgets that don't wear out every year,a nd that actually have power when and where you need it.

Quantum_Conundrum
3 / 5 (2) Oct 23, 2010
smokabowl420:

Our society is not "consumer based". The only reason gadgets are "consumed" is because they are designed to break just in time to force you to buy the next product.

Another example:

I don't care about HD television, because the basic was just fine. With very rare exceptions, the human eye cannot even discern the difference between basic and HD, and it doesn't matter at all unless the movie, sport, or show was filmed with an HD camera anyway, which most of the stuff on television is 10 year old re-runs anyway...except on the $10 per month premium channels.

So I didn't ask for HD, and neither did most anyone else. But it is forced on the consumer over time, whether you want it or not, so that the cable company can charge you an even higher bill.

Sort of like how Disney is selling Beauty and the Beast in "HD," and the damn thing has a 256 color pallete.

This isn't consumer based. It's producer brainwashing idiots.
NameIsNotNick
not rated yet Oct 23, 2010
A POS iPad clone. How exciting.

Clone? It runs a real OS. It runs real business apps. You are obviously not in the target demographic...
NameIsNotNick
4 / 5 (1) Oct 23, 2010
Smaller than an iPad ?? That's already too small, IMHO...

I used to like small... but as I get older...
Quantum_Conundrum
3 / 5 (2) Oct 23, 2010
Give it a rest, whoever gave me a 1/5.

Designed to fail is pretty much a fact which can be proven by the simple observation of the absurdly long life spans of NASA space probes such as Pioneer and Voyager, as compared to normal products. Here, these craft have operated for ~30 years without breaking, and the only reason some parts have been shut down is due to power supply running low. But here on earth, you can't get a gadget to last 2 years without everything about it breaking.

It's the same old thing. In capitalism, you can't profit by curing cancer, you can only profit by treating the symptoms. Same deal with technology. You don't make money if you make a light bulb or computer that never breaks.
x646d63
3.7 / 5 (3) Oct 23, 2010
Designed to fail is pretty much a fact which can be proven by the simple observation of the absurdly long life spans of NASA space probes such as Pioneer and Voyager, as compared to normal products. Here, these craft have operated for ~30 years without breaking, and the only reason some parts have been shut down is due to power supply running low. But here on earth, you can't get a gadget to last 2 years without everything about it breaking.


I rarely have electronic devices fail. I have had six cell phones in 11 years and all six still work fine. I upgraded because technology got better. Ever heard of Moore's Law?

Comparing a $1200 HDTV to the $865 Million dollar Voyager 1 project is pretty stupid, frankly.

In capitalism, you can't profit by curing cancer, you can only profit by treating the symptoms.


I assure you that if a cure for cancer were found, someone would make a sh|t-ton of money with it. You are just plain silly.

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