The new home of Envisat

October 28, 2010
Artist's impression of Envisat. Credits: ESA

ESA’s Earth-observing satellite Envisat has moved to a lower orbit in order to conserve fuel and extend its life by three years, and is once again delivering invaluable data to thousands of scientists.

Envisat, launched in 2002, has a unique combination of 10 different instruments that collect data about Earth’s atmosphere, land, sea and ice – providing scientists with the most detailed picture yet of the state of our planet.

Initially intended to stay in orbit for five years, the decision was taken to extend the mission until 2010. However, given the overall excellent condition of the , ESA Member States agreed last year to fund the mission through to 2013.

This image is one of the first acquired by Envisat's Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) instrument (27 October 2010 around 7:30 UTC), just a few hours after the Earth-observing satellite reached its new orbit. The image features the Volga delta in Russia and Kazakhstan and the northern Caspian Sea. Preliminary checks indicate the instrument is delivering the same high-quality data as it did before the satellite's orbit was lowered from 800 km to 783 km, beginning on 22 October. The size of the image is about 800 by 700 km. Credits: ESA

In order for the satellite to stay operational another three years, engineers from ESA’s European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) in Noordwijk, The Netherlands, came up with a plan to minimise fuel use by moving it to a lower orbit so it would no longer have to correct for the gradual change in orbit inclination during this period.

The Envisat orbit change project, called 'Envisat 2010+', to lower it from about 800 km to about 783 km began on the morning of 22 October. The 8000-kg satellite was lowered by about 10 km with two 28-minute repositioning moves. Following another two manoeuvres on the evening of 26 October, the satellite was lowered an additional 7 km, reaching its new final altitude.

Envisat’s instruments were slowly switched back on starting on 27 October, and the satellite is now gradually resuming its normal activities.

This image of Greenland’s Jakobshavn Glacier (right) was acquired by Envisat’s Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) instrument on 27 October 2010, just hours after reaching its new orbit. The preliminary verification indicates that the ASAR instrument is delivering the same high-quality data as before the satellite's orbit was lowered from 800 km to 783 km, beginning on 22 October. Jakobshavn, one of Greenland’s fastest moving glaciers, has been constantly observed by ESA’s Envisat and ERS-2 SAR instruments for the last 20 years. The size of the image is about 160 km by 90 km. Credits: ESA

ESA Envisat Mission Manager Henri Laur said: "The first images acquired from the new altitude confirm that the satellite is in good health and that the manoeuvres have been successful.

"The teams are now very busy running intensive checks on Envisat’s space and ground systems."

Users will begin receiving Envisat data and products again on 2 November. A mini-commissioning phase is scheduled for November and December. Many different teams will verify the quality of the 'new' Envisat data of more than 100 measurements about our planet, including sea-surface temperature, vegetation indices and greenhouse gas concentrations.

2010+ is an ambitious project with teams from three ESA establishments – ESTEC, the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) in Darmstadt, Germany, and the Earth observation centre (ESRIN) in Frascati, Italy – working round the clock to ensure minimal disruptions for the satellite’s numerous operational and scientific data users.

Explore further: Scientists meet to review Envisat results after two and a half years of operations

Related Stories

ESA and JAXA satellites 'talk' to each other

December 1, 2006

ESA's Envisat satellite and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) data relay test satellite Kodama have successfully completed an interoperability test demonstrating that scientific data from Envisat can be transmitted ...

Explore planet Earth in near-real time

December 5, 2006

Have you ever wanted to track natural events in progress, such as fires, floods and volcanic eruptions, or simply explore the planet through the eyes of a satellite? ESA has created a website, MIRAVI, which gives access to ...

Envisat still going strong after five successful years

February 28, 2007

Launched from Kourou in French Guiana on the night of 28 February 2002, ESA’s Envisat spacecraft marks its fifth year in space. Having orbited Earth more than 26 000 times, the world’s largest and most complex environmental ...

ESA satellites flying in formation

December 3, 2008

(PhysOrg.com) -- Based on the outstanding success of the first tandem mission between ERS-2 and Envisat last year, ESA has paired the two satellites together again to help improve our understanding of the planet.

ESA extends Envisat satellite mission

June 5, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- ESA Member States have unanimously voted to extend the Envisat mission through to 2013. Envisat - the world’s largest and most sophisticated satellite ever built - has been providing scientists and operational ...

Recommended for you

At Saturn, one of these rings is not like the others

September 2, 2015

When the sun set on Saturn's rings in August 2009, scientists on NASA's Cassini mission were watching closely. It was the equinox—one of two times in the Saturnian year when the sun illuminates the planet's enormous ring ...

New Horizons team selects potential Kuiper Belt flyby target

August 29, 2015

NASA has selected the potential next destination for the New Horizons mission to visit after its historic July 14 flyby of the Pluto system. The destination is a small Kuiper Belt object (KBO) known as 2014 MU69 that orbits ...

Prawn Nebula: Cosmic recycling

September 2, 2015

Dominating this image is part of the nebula Gum 56, illuminated by the hot bright young stars that were born within it. For millions of years stars have been created out of the gas in this nebula, material which is later ...

Image: Hubble sees a youthful cluster

August 31, 2015

Shown here in a new image taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on board the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope is the globular cluster NGC 1783. This is one of the biggest globular clusters in the Large Magellanic ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.